Apply through Clearing

0300 303 6300

Apply online

Apply through Clearing

If you’ve got your results you can beat the rush and make your application now.

BSc (Hons) Automotive Technology with Management

Due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, examinations may be replaced by an alternative form of assessment during the academic year 2020/2021. Please refer to the Programme Specification on these pages for further details.

Study at one of the largest engineering schools in the UK
Study at one of the largest engineering schools in the UK
Fine tune your designs, using our Cruden F1 race simulator
Fine tune your designs, using our Cruden F1 race simulator
You can join this course without A-level maths or physics
You can join this course without A-level maths or physics

This course includes the sandwich year options of:

Work Placement*

Study abroad*

*No fees are charged for this year

Why choose this course?

  • This BSc Honours degree course in Automotive Technology with Management is part of a suite of automotive related courses
  • Our BSc Automotive Technology with Management students have previously completed work placement years at companies including: Nissan and Triumph Motorcycles
  • Graduates highly employable in wide range of firms from Formula One to major motor manufacturers
  • Involvement in Formula Student Competition from year 1, if you wish
  • Recent Automotive Technology graduates have gone on to work at organisations including: Nissan, Dyson, and Bentley Motors
  • You do not need an A-level in Mathematics or Physics to gain entry to this course, you simply need the correct UCAS points and your enthusiasm for the subject.

What's the course about?

This course gives you the broad-ranging skills to support the development of automotive products. It blends practical study in workshops and well- equipped labs (such as computer simulation, design, vehicle technology, production and manufacture) with management and business studies modules. A particular focus is on group work, which will enable you to develop your team-working skills and improve your employability. You’ll also have the unique opportunity to work with engineering students in designing, building and racing a Formula Student race car.

What will I study?

The School has a reputation for innovation in teaching and learning with most modules delivered through a combination of traditional face to face teaching and distance learning through the university's StudyNet web based facility.  StudyNet allows students to access electronic learning resources, electronic discussion with staff and other students, and, for some modules, submit coursework 24/7 from anywhere in the world!  With a heavy emphasis on Computer Aided Engineering, the school has a policy of using industrial standard software wherever possible.  The School also operate an open access laboratory policy of when possible students doing experiments in their own time.

What you will learn

Rapid changes in technology and global business structures mean that today's graduates need to be flexible and versatile. This broad-based automotive course, covering computer simulation and design, vehicle technology, production, manufacture, management and business studies equips you for a wide variety of career paths.

In the first year of this BSc Honours degree course in Automotive Technology with Management you will gain a good grounding in engineering, covering technology, information technology and management. You're also introduced to fundamentals of vehicle design covering engines, powertrain, body, steering, suspension and vehicle systems, and will study the structure of the automotive industry.

In your second year you will extend your knowledge of core technologies, IT and business skills as they are applied within the automotive sector. This includes vehicle design, and the factors that influence it, together with vehicle aerodynamics including wind tunnel testing. You will develop IT expertise in CAD and CAM, simulation and analysis techniques. You will also have the opportunity to be involved with the Class 200 Formula Student car, developing the previous year's Formula Student entry.

In your final year you will concentrate on the application of automotive technology - including automotive body engineering, chassis and powertrain technology - and key business skills. A vehicle design project fosters teamwork capabilities that employers value, and you have the chance to develop more specialist knowledge by exploring a topic that particularly interests you. You also have the opportunity to be involved with the development of the University's entry to the Formula Student competition.

Student Blogs

Dobromir - Week at a glance

My week at a glance

Hello! This is what a typical week looks like for me as a student at the University of Hertfordshire!

At first, as a newly arrived second-year student, my week schedule was chaotic but trust me, once three or four weeks of the semester have passed you will have already got used to the pace and will have developed at least a basic schedule for your week, as I did. For me, it is all about the balance between university, part-time work, and social life.

Monday

On Mondays, as I have a part-time job, I usually go to work in the morning until lunch and then head back to university for two hours of face-to-face teaching in the early afternoon. After I finish lectures, I dedicate my late afternoon to revisiting lecture notes and working on assignments, sometimes ahead of their time, to avoid falling behind. My evening is usually spent in the gym and then resting.

Tuesday

Tuesdays are quite hectic for me, as I am out from 09:00 to 20:00. I spend the first half of my day at lectures and, after a short break in the afternoon, I head to work and stay there until 20:00. As you can expect, after such a long and exhausting day, all I can do when I’m back home is just to relax and get some good sleep.

Wednesday

My Wednesdays are flipped Mondays, since I go to lectures in the morning, refresh and then head to work, where I spend my afternoon. At evening time, I go through and catch up on lecture and tutorial notes, if I have missed something, and work on assignments. In Engineering, most projects require you to work in a group with other fellow students. The Learning Resource Centre (LRC) is where you will work on group projects as it is most convenient for gathering people. The environment is very relaxing and much of the time is spent chatting and having fun, so be ready to spend a substantial part of your time in the LRC!

Thursday

My whole Thursdays are spent at university as I have lectures from 09:00 to 18:00 and I am keen on attending all of them. Don’t get intimidated, there are regular breaks between lectures that give students more than enough time to refresh! As you can imagine, after my last lecture, I would rather do some exercise, so I will go to the gym and let go of excessive energy.

Friday

On Fridays, as my schedule is quite free, I take my time in the morning to meet up with fellow students and work on assignments. Getting through afternoon lectures is easy and feels like it happens instantaneously as everyone is excited about the end of the workweek and wants to go out. And, as you can expect, that is exactly what happens on a Friday afternoon. I go out for a walk with friends, if the weather is nice, and in the evening, we go to a pub and celebrate the end of the workweek.

Saturday

I value my free time and for that exact reason, I spend the first half of my Saturday studying and working on assignments. I avoid distractions, as the sooner, I finish, the sooner I will be able to go out and have fun. Afternoon time is usually spent shopping, going to a café with friends or at the gym

Sunday

My Sundays are almost identical to my Saturdays with the only difference that at evening I take 30 minutes, sometimes even less, to check my progress with my assignments, make sure I don’t miss any deadlines and plan out a schedule for the upcoming week. Then it is time for a good recharge before the week starts.

At first, all the things you must do as a student sound like a lot to handle, but, trust me, it will all come naturally, and you will eventually learn to handle your tasks with ease!

Things you need to know before studying Engineering at Herts

Preparation

When you arrive at university, you will be overwhelmed with many emotions: some students get excited about all the new people they are about to meet, others feel intimidated by the new environment. Regardless of how you feel, try not to compare university to anything you have experienced before. I have already gone through this stage and I can tell you that university life is differs a lot from anything I have experienced so far. If you feel nervous, know that you are not alone. You are on the same boat with more than 1500 other newly arrived students, so just open yourself up for this new opportunity and go out and speak to people. You won’t believe how easy it is to make friends, especially during Fresher’s Week and at The Forum.

Qualifications

Many people believe that you can only be a good Engineering student if you have taken A-Levels in Mathematics, but you will be pleased to hear that this is not true. I graduated from high school with a diploma in foreign languages and my knowledge in mathematics has always been average. Nevertheless, my performance in all mathematics and mathematics related modules in university has been excellent so far. The teaching staff is so good and there is so much support at uni, that you can rest assured you will receive the best help you can get if you struggle with studies.

Reading

As a student in engineering, you will not be required to read too many articles or books. Do not get me wrong, there will be a lot of work and you will really have to put effort into studying if you want to have good grades. For most of the time, you will be working on various software programs, you will spend a good portion of your time in laboratories and at the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) and you will also, depending on how good you are at maths, have to invest some or a lot of your time into solving exercises. Group projects are also an essential part of your experience at university.

Assignments

The nature of a job as an engineer in almost any company requires you to work well in a team. University is really good at preparing you for that and therefore most of your assignments will require you to work well in a team. Some people are naturally good at that, others, like me, are not that good at it, but you will learn fairly quickly. Be prepared to spend the majority of your time working on assignments with fellow students. The environment is really relaxing and, often times, working together is so fun that you don’t notice how time flies.

Assessments

In engineering, you will be assessed mostly through group or individual assignments, practical lab works and exams. The ways of assessing you are very similar to how your performance at a company will be assessed: some of them test your ability to work in a group and others test your performance under pressure. Either way, every type of assessment has benefits that will prepare you for a career as an engineer.

Time Management

Managing your time wisely is crucial for succeeding at university and later on in life. So, a piece of advice I could give to you would be to learn to regularly check your schedule and plan out your activities at least a week in advance. It’s very helpful that you can download the lecture timetable on your mobile device and easily keep track of your engagements and work other activities around them.

Student Blogs

Dobromir - Things you should know

Things you need to know before studying Engineering at Herts

Hello! I am a second-year student in Automotive Engineering with Motorsport and in this guide, I will give you the basics you need to know about before you start studying at university!

Preparation

When you arrive at university, you will be overwhelmed with many emotions: some students get excited about all the new people they are about to meet, others feel intimidated by the new environment. Regardless of how you feel, try not to compare university to anything you have experienced before. I have already gone through this stage and I can tell you that university life differs a lot from anything I have experienced so far. If you feel nervous, know that you are not alone. You are on the same boat with more than 1500 other newly arrived students, so just open yourself up for this new opportunity and go out and speak to people. You won’t believe how easy it is to make friends, especially during Fresher’s Week and at The Forum.

Qualifications

Many people believe that you can only be a good Engineering student if you have taken A-Levels in Mathematics, but you will be pleased to hear that this is not true. I graduated from high school with a diploma in foreign languages and my knowledge in mathematics has always been average. Nevertheless, my performance in all mathematics and mathematics-related modules in university has been excellent so far. The teaching staff is so good and there is so much support at university, that you can rest assured you will receive the best help you can get if you struggle with studies.

Reading

As a student in engineering, you will not be required to read too many articles or books. Do not get me wrong, there will be a lot of work and you will really have to put effort into studying if you want to have good grades. For most of the time, you will be working on various software programs, you will spend a good portion of your time in laboratories and at the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) and you will also, depending on how good you are at maths, have to invest some or a lot of your time into solving exercises. Group projects are also an essential part of your experience at university.

Assignments

The nature of a job as an engineer in almost any company requires you to work well in a team. University is really good at preparing you for that and therefore most of your assignments will require you to work well in a team. Some people are naturally good at that, others, like me, are not that good at it, but you will learn fairly quickly. Be prepared to spend the majority of your time working on assignments with fellow students. The environment is really relaxing and, oftentimes, working together is so fun that you don’t notice how time flies.

Assessments

In engineering, you will be assessed mostly through group or individual assignments, practical lab works and exams. The ways of assessing you are very similar to how your performance at a company will be assessed: some of them test your ability to work in a group and others test your performance under pressure. Either way, every type of assessment has benefits that will prepare you for a career as an engineer.

Time Management

Managing your time wisely is crucial for succeeding at university and later on in life. So, a piece of advice I could give to you would be to learn to regularly check your schedule and plan out your activities at least a week in advance. It’s very helpful that you can download the lecture timetable on your mobile device and easily keep track of your engagements and work other activities around them.

Student Blogs

Dobromir - Guide to the facilities

Guide to the Engineering facilities

Hello! This is my guide to all engineering facilities, how I use them and how you can benefit from them.

As an engineering student, you will spend most of your time on College Lane Campus, like lectures, tutorials, practical lab works, and assessments are all held at the School of Engineering and Technology. There are plenty of facilities available to you, however, speaking from personal experience, I can tell you that the one you will use the most will be the Learning Resource Centre (LRC).

Learning Resource Centres (LRCs)

Most of the modules will not require you to read too many articles or books other than the ones you already use in class. However, you will have a lot of assignments that consist of working on a project in a group with other fellow students. There is one LRC on College Lane Campus and another one on de Havilland Campus. Both LRCs have study rooms with projectors and desks, which make them very convenient for group gatherings. Both LRCs are identical, and you will use the one that is closer to your accommodation, regardless if it is on-campus or off-campus. If you, for any reason, wish to go to the LRC located further away from you, there is a shuttle bus that can take you from one campus to the other in less than five minutes. If the weather is nice and you wish to walk instead of taking the bus, it’ll take you less than 15 minutes to get from one campus to the other.

The LRCs have many computers, equipped with all software you use in class, and there are laptops for loan. There are study rooms you can book, especially useful for group gatherings, there are desks you can study at, or if you prefer silence, the last floor of each LRC is for silence study. If you study better at complete isolation, there are silent rooms, designed for just a single person (they are perfect if you don’t want to get distracted by anything). If you want to take a break, each library has a café, which offers a range of snacks, as well as coffee.

Online Library

If you prefer to stay home, instead of going to the LRC, the online library is a perfect option for you. You can access the University’s online library, where you can find any book that you can otherwise find at the LRC. Most books related to engineering have online copies available, so if you feel more comfortable studying at the comfort of your home, rest assured you can do so.

Support

During your studies at university, you can be sure that there will always be dedicated support at your disposal. As an engineering student, you will have several modules in mathematics and if that is something you struggle with, you can always use the Math’s support service, which is found at College Lane LRC. In addition to that, you can always speak to your lecturers in class or after class, or you can email or go to a drop-in session, if necessary. Same goes for all other modules as well, no lecturer will ever send you back. In fact, they may invite you to attend their drop-in session, where they will have a better opportunity to help you.

In terms of preparing yourself for starting and developing a successful career as an engineer, or if you want to get a part-time job, you will need to write a perfect CV (Curriculum Vitae) that will make you stand out from the others. For this purpose, you can use the Careers and employability service, where you will get advice and help from professionals in the branch. You can book a session, during which you will be able to discuss you CV and Cover Letter, if you wish to apply for a placement or a graduate scheme, and get advice on how to improve them.

Student Blogs

Tom

Alumni Stories

Lee Stretch

Meet Lee Stretch who has achieved great success in motorsport engineering since graduating in 2011. He currently works as a Vehicles Dynamic Engineer for Ferrari's Formula One team.

Current job roleVehicles Dynamic Engineer
Year of graduation2011
Course of studyMEng (Hons) Automotive Engineering with Motorsport

Lee Stretch

Facilities and experience

Lee made his decision to study at the University of Hertfordshire when he attended an open day, which included a visit to the Formula Student automotive workshop. 'The students had designed and built a single seat racing car which they raced against other universities. It blew me away!' His love of Formula Student became the catalyst for where he is today.

Lee felt the course itself was well rounded, covering all aspects of engineering, with a focus on design, which he enjoyed. Crucial moments of Lee's studies, from submitting his final year project, to designing a racing car in parallel with his full-time sandwich year job, taught him what is possible with determination, and a deadline.

This culminated in second place at Formula Student Germany - the best result ever for a UK team. 'Without these experiences, perhaps I wouldn't have had the guts to move to Italy.' He says, 'I've applied so many of the topics I studied at Herts to my career at Formula One. I regularly find myself reaching for my student notes from five years ago!'

Exciting career

After graduating, Lee worked with Mercedes GP as a Performance Simulation Engineer where he worked with some of the most sophisticated lap simulation tools in the industry. 'It was a very hard three years at Mercedes but equally rewarding, with the 2014 World Championship being the icing on the cake.'

Lee's passion and commitment was recognised by the only other team that he would have considered moving to - Ferrari. Lee moved to Italy and spent time learning Italian. After only six months in the role, he had contributed to next year's cooling system, and continues to develop the team's lap simulation tools. 'To help return Ferrari to the top of Formula One would be a dream come true!'

Despite working in a relatively specialised group of vehicle performance, Lee's role demands sound mechanical understanding, thermodynamics, practical design considerations and even pure mathematics in simulation. 'Communication is paramount, so all the report writing, presentation and team working skills necessary in the final two years of my degree have proved hugely beneficial.'

The only thing better than winning the 2014 World Championships with Mercedes, would be to win it again with Ferrari. Without the unforgettable experiences I shared with my peers and staff at the University, I don't believe I'd have had the courage to take on this challenge.

Alumni Stories

Ross Barrow

Meet Ross Barrow who pursued a career in the automotive industry after graduating. He currently works as a Lead Engineer at Jaguar Land Rover.

Current job roleLead Engineer
Year of graduation2010
Course of studyBSc(Hons) Automotive Technology with Management

Ross Barrow

University experience

While at university, Ross took every opportunity which was offered to him. Seizing the chance for a sandwich year, he accepted a 1-year work placement in Research and Development at Sabric Innovative Plastics. Based in the Netherlands, Ross had the best of both worlds. He was able to gain professional work experience and discover a new culture, new friends and a new way of life.

His placement focussed on quality improvement and generating design ideas. When the opportunity arose to become certified in Six Sigma (a strategy for improving business processes) he jumped at the chance to gain sought after transferable skills.

When he returned to university to finish his studies, he used the knowledge and contacts he’d gained at Sabric Innovative Plastics to inspire his final year project. Collaborating with the company, he agreed on a brief to create a new portfolio of materials and information. His sandwich year directly impacted the success of his final year project and the company are still using his resources today.

Career progression

Upon graduating, Ross believed it was vital for his career prospects to find work with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). After a few interviews, he decided to work with RLE International, a consultancy, engineering and recruitment agency. This gave him the opportunity to work on large-scale projects with Ford and Nissan.

His first role at Ford was as a Component Design Engineer for the Ford Transit Custom vehicle.  He later progressed to Platform Launch Leader. At Nissan, he was responsible for the delivery of the body sides for the Nissan Leaf.

'I made the decision to leave RLE International after three years, in order to work as a permanent member of staff at a major OEM. As a result, I'll have a constant role in developing the vehicles of the future within a single organisation.'

Ross now works at Jaguar Land Rover as the Lead Engineer in the Body Engineering team. His role focusses on strategic planning.  This involves solving cross-vehicle key engineering issues and developing techniques to apply new body structure technology to future vehicle programmes.

It was an amazing and life-changing experience to work abroad and something which really matured me.

Please note that some of the images and videos on our course pages may have been taken before social distancing rules in the UK came into force.