About the course

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A degree in English Literature with Film will help you grow from passionate reader and film-fan into a critical thinker able to understand literary and cinematic works by applying a wide range of critical, theoretical, political and historical perspectives. The disciplines of Literature and Film Studies are highly complementary, and as you progress through your degree you will find many fruitful connections between them.

This fascinating degree is both geographically and historically wide-ranging. This means you’ll study literature written in English from the Renaissance to the present day, by writers from all parts of the globe; and alongside this, you’ll explore film and television from America, Asia, Britain and the rest of Europe, from the earliest days of moving images to some of the most exciting contemporary work being produced today.

In both disciplines, you’ll be taught by research-active academics who bring fresh thinking to our accessible, engaging courses. We’ll introduce you to writers and film-makers who will open doors to contemporary worlds and cultures remote from your own, and also help you explore more familiar works – both textual and visual – in ways that challenge your preconceptions.

Whatever your taste in literature, there will be something to interest and provoke you. From The Tiger Who Came to Tea to Jane Eyre, from Paradise Lost to Zadie Smith’s Swing Time, we’ll broaden your literary horizons and hone your critical thinking.

A core Literature module in your first year will equip you to read and interpret both traditional and contemporary literary texts critically as a scholar of English literature. Alongside this you can choose to revisit Shakespeare and consider his cultural relevance today through fictional, cinematic and TV adaptations; or to deepen your understanding of Gothic writing by tracing its origins back to the Romantic era.

In your second year you’ll focus on period-based literature from the Renaissance onwards and gain an understanding of literary history, from Elizabethan verse and drama, via Augustan poetry and the emergence of the novel in the 18 th century, to the radical transformations of the Victorian age, and the emergence of modernity in the twentieth century.

You’ll also have the opportunity to consider ways of reading that go beyond textual analysis or historical context, such as understanding literature through the political or ideological lens of Marxism, feminism and post-colonial theory. You’ll have the chance to specialise in your final year, tailoring your literary study to reflect your own interests. Themed options include children’s literature, young adult fiction, Renaissance tragedy, European crime fiction, literary adaptations and the culture of print in the 18th century.

At the same time, your minor in Film will further hone your analytical skills, and give you a sophisticated appreciation of the craft of filmmaking. You’ll look at how the film and television industry has evolved and adapted to new technologies, how novels are recreated in film and how film gives us fresh perspectives on the world. You’ll also have opportunities to design and run film programmes, write and produce your own short films and hear guest lectures by film, television and media professionals. Topics covered range from silent movies to the Golden Age of Hollywood, the birth of the blockbuster, the influence of European style on American film, the way digital technology has transformed the industry, and why franchises have proved so successful, from James Bond and Star Wars to the Marvel cinematic universe.

Why choose this course?

We give you: 

  • The chance to explore the cross-over between these highly complementary disciplines.
  • An expert academic team to support you and build your confidence as you develop into a scholar with expertise in both fields, plus the opportunity to get involved with local cinemas and our own bespoke film club.
  • A global approach to both Literature and Film, providing both a broad overview of literary and cinematic history and the chance to study more specialised areas of interest.
  • Teaching rated excellent by 92.14% of our students in the 2018 National Student Survey.
  • CV-building potential through work placements and extra-curricular activities.

What job can I get?

Employability is central to everything we do. Our courses equip you with transferable, intellectual and personal skills and experiences that are valued by employers in a wide range of industries. As a graduate in English Literature with Film, you will be an excellent communicator with high levels of textual and visual literacy, skills which are invaluable to employers in a digital age. Past students have gone on to careers in teaching, publishing and the media, journalism and marketing. Many of our graduates go on to higher levels of study, engaging in research in their chosen fields.

Course details

Teaching methods

Students of English Literature with Film will be taught in a variety of ways according to the characteristics of each module. Many are taught via weekly lectures and weekly seminars, and there are timetabled weekly screenings to make sure that you always have the chance to see the films you are studying. Workshops are used in English Literature to discuss subjects in more depth and encourage independent analysis, and in Film for modules where the practical skills taught are enhanced by the supervision of experts in their field. You may be assessed using innovative methods such as the video-essay, for which you will be taught highly transferable skills in editing and presenting. You will also be expected to read and watch primary material in your own time, to contribute to online discussions, and to download and read notes from StudyNet, our virtual learning environment.

Work Placement

You can choose a work experience module, Literature at Work, which explores English in the classroom and aspects of the literary heritage industry. The module is centred around a six-week work placement where you’ll gain valuable transferable skills. Our students have worked as school classroom assistants, in publishing houses or attractions such as London’s Charles Dickens Museum and Dr Johnson’s House.

You can – additionally or alternatively – go on a longer work placement between your second and third year of study at the University. The Placement Year provides you with the opportunity to set your academic studies in a broader, practical context and to gain experience in specific areas relevant to your fields of study. You will also strengthen your time management, organisational and communication skills as well as develop employability skills.

The Placement Year helps you to develop as an independent learner and apply the communication, analytical and other skills gained from studying to the workplace. 

When you return, you'll resume your studies in your final year before graduating.

Study Abroad

A natural step from studying global literature and film is to spend time abroad to experience the world for yourself. We encourage our students to take a year’s study abroad at one of our many partner institutions across the world. We have a fabulous selection of partner institutions, each with something distinctive to offer. Wherever you choose to go, studying overseas will broaden your horizons and enhance your understanding of other cultures, which can only make you a better student of literature.

Find out more about our Study abroad opportunities.

Structure

Level 4

Core Modules

  • Introduction to Film Criticism - 15 Credits
  • Texts Up Close: Reading and Interpretation - 15 Credits
  • Make it New: Literary Tradition and Experimentation - 15 Credits
  • Border Crossings: Modern Literature from around the World - 15 Credits
  • Genre, Styles and Stars - 15 Credits
  • Shakespeare Reframed - 15 Credits
  • American Voices: Introduction to US Literature and Culture - 15 Credits
  • Romantic Origins & Gothic Afterlives - 15 Credits

Optional

  • Journeys and Quests: Adventures in Literature - 15 Credits
  • Identity and Contemporary Writing - 15 Credits

Level 5

Core Modules

  • Ways of Reading: Literature and Theory - 15 Credits
  • Graduate Skills - 0 Credits
  • A Nation of Readers: British Identity and Enlightenment Culture - 15 Credits
  • Revisiting the Renaissance - 15 Credits

Optional

  • Studies in Twentieth Century Literature, 1900-1945 - 15 Credits
  • American Literature to 1900 - 15 Credits
  • Twentieth Century North American Writing - 15 Credits
  • Images of Contemporary Society: British Literature and the Politics of Identity - 15 Credits
  • Age of Transition: the Victorians and Modernity - 15 Credits
  • Literature at Work - 15 Credits

Fees & funding

Fees 2019

UK/EU Students

Full time
  • £9250 for the 2019/2020 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

View detailed information about tuition fees

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

Entry requirements...

72 - 168 UCAS points

IB – 72 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above. Find out more about international application requirements.

GCSE Maths grade 4 (D) and English Language grade 4 (C) or above.

The University of Hertfordshire is committed to welcoming students with a wide range of qualifications and levels of experience. The entry requirements listed on the course pages provide a guide to the minimum level of qualifications needed to study each course. However, we have a flexible approach to admissions and each application will be considered on an individual basis.

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band.

If you do not have the required IELTS or equivalent for direct entry on to your degree programme, our Pre-sessional English and International Foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

For country specific qualifications, please visit our Your Country page.

How to apply

2019

Start DateEnd DateLink
23/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time)
23/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
23/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2020

Start DateEnd DateLink
23/09/202031/05/2021Apply online (Full Time)
23/09/202031/05/2021Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
23/09/202031/05/2021Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)