Mechanical Engineering BEng (Hons)

About the course

1/

Whilst this course shares some modules with both the Aerospace Systems Engineering and Automotive Engineering programmes, it gives you flexibility to gain employment across a broader range of industries.  It is also the first step towards gaining chartered engineer status.

What you will learn
 

You will study the fundamental skills and knowledge required by a modern engineer including principles of flight and an introduction to aircraft systems.  In particular you will be introduced to computer packages commonly used in the aerospace industry.  You will learn about the design process and will have the opportunity to work on the Class 200 Formula Student car.

First Year:  You will study aerospace technology and industry or motorsport and automotive technology, engineering mathematics, engineering applications of mathematics, materials and electrical science, mechanical science, introduction to manufacturing technology, introduction to design, and fluid mechanics and thermodynamics.

Second Year:  You will study thermofluid mechanics, further engineering mathematics, computer-aided engineering (CAE), structural mechanics, dynamics, data acquisition and control systems, integrated engineering system design and project management and product development.

Third Year:  You have the option of taking an integrated one-year professional placement.

Final Year (3rd or 4th):  You will study mechanical engineering design, micro-engineering and micro-technology or manufacturing strategy, mechanics and properties of materials, control systems, thermofluid mechanics and heat transfer, vibration, noise and vehicle dynamics, and an individual major project.

Why choose this course?

  • This BEng Honours degree in Mechanical Engineering has been highly successful and over the years produced thousands of successful graduates working in all fields of engineering;
  • You can apply your knowledge to typical mechanical projects such as the design of a hovercraft;
  • You may join the automotive students and help design, build and race single-seater race car in the UK Formula Student Competition;
  • You may join aerospace students on projects involving Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs), rocketry and space tourism;
  • You will learn how to apply computer-aided engineering and industrial-standard software, recommended by the Automotive Industry Advisory Panel.

Entry requirements...

280 UCAS points

GCE A Levels must include both Mathematics and Physics or Technology or engineering-based subjects.

NB General Studies / Critical Thinking will not be accepted as part of the total UCAS points achieved.

We also accept:

  • Engineering BTEC Extended National Diploma at DMM to include Distinction in the Further Maths unit.
  • Engineering Advanced Diploma to include GCE A level Maths as the Additional and Specialist Learning (ASL) component.
  • Access to Engineering Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Distinction in Maths and Science or Principles units; and all other Level 3 credits must be at Merit.

GCSEs must include Mathematics, English Language and Science at C or above.

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency. The following qualifications and grades will be considered 
- GCSE English language grade A-C 
- IELTS 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any band)
Other English language tests are accepted. Please contact the International Office for details.

Study routes

  • Full Time, 3 Years
  • Sandwich, 4 Years

Locations

  • University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield

Careers

Professional chartered mechanical engineers and mechanical engineering graduates are highly sought after around the world. Our graduates have an excellent employment record illustrating that this degree gives you the flexibility to work in virtually any manufacturing setting, both in the UK and abroad.   MEng graduates in particular can expect to be in senior managerial positions within a few years.

More about the Course

Our School of Engineering and Technology is well known for project-orientated learning, and mechanical engineers have the opportunity to take part in exciting team projects such as the UH Hovercraft, the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (ESCO-UAS) competition or the Formula Student competition. For more information see racing.herts.ac.uk

Our students can take the work placement option, spending their Third Year in industry.  Some students take the opportunity to study part of their degree abroad through student exchange programmes with other universities in the EU, USA or Canada.

A mechanical engineering degree will provide you with the flexibility to be employed in any industrial company irrespective of their product range.  Mechanical engineers are involved in producing innovative designs, using the latest materials and Computer Aided Engineering systems to meet ever-increasing expectations in 21st century living.  With our excellent teaching standards and facilities, the University has a strong track record of providing industry with these highly skilled professionals.

In your first year you will study the fundamental skills and knowledge required by a modern engineer including principles of flight and an introduction to aircraft systems.  In particular you will be introduced to computer packages commonly used in the aerospace industry.

In your second year the core themes from year 1 are further developed so that they can be applied to solve engineering problems encountered in industrial and commercial environments. You will learn about the design process, through both group design and detail design work, and will have the opportunity to work on the Class 200 Formula Student car.

In the third year you have the chance to work for an engineering company on placement.

In the final year, whilst adding to your knowledge of materials and structures, vibration and noise, and control systems, you have the option of covering either manufacturing or the rapidly growing field of micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS). Project work, both in teams on design and individually on a topic of special interest, encourages you to develop valuable practical, interpersonal and communication skills. You also have the opportunity to work on the University's entry to the Formula Student competition.

Teaching methods

The school has a reputation for innovation in teaching and learning with most modules delivered through a combination of traditional face to face teaching and distance learning through the university's StudyNet web based facility. StudyNet allows students to access electronic learning resources, electronic discussion with staff and other students, and, for some modules, submit coursework 24/7 from anywhere in the world!  With a heavy emphasis on Computer Aided Engineering, the school has a policy of using industrial standard software wherever possible. The school also operate an open access laboratory policy of when possible students doing experiments in their own time.

Work Placement

You have the opportunity to spend a year working either in a professional research environment or within industry. The practical experience you gain will be of tremendous benefit both when you resume your studies and when you embark on a career. Students have previously undertaken placements in organisations such as:

  • Rolls Royce Cars
  • United Glass
  • ATT
  • Turner Powertrain Systems
  • Xerox

Professional Accreditations

Accredited for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status by the Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS), the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Structure

Year 1

Core Modules

  • Introduction to Design

    This module introduces students to the process of engineering design, and to CAD tools for creating and documenting design solutions. The principles and standard practices of technical drawing and tolerancing are taught. The role and use of CAD in design is taught and practiced, both 3D solid modelling and 2D drafting. The nature of design as a structured process is considered, and demonstrated by students undertaking a variety of design exercise and assignments. The design activities are mostly done in small teams, thereby developing skills in teamwork, communication and leadership. There are staged assessments that require the students to present their work using a variety of methods and communication tools.

  • Career Skills Development

    This module will ensure students are able to utilise the University system for PDP (Personal Development Planning using MAPS (My Active Planning System). Using the PDP processes each student will be able to record and update their own records which will aid monitoring their progress personally and academically. Support will be provided on tools, techniques and good practices through a Study Skills programme, MAPS and relating this to future professional development. The student will be assisted using the support detailed above through the first weeks of the academic year by academic staff. There will be further sessions in the second semester.

  • Introduction to Manufacturing Technology

    This module introduces the student to a range of production processes and practice used commonly in the manufacture of products. Students develop a hands-on appreciation of production techniques including turning, milling, fabrication and assembly using manual and computer controlled plant and machinery. Transferable skills are developed in the application of the processes used to the manufacture of a range of products and sub-assemblies taking into account design and supply requirements.

  • Materials and Electrical Science

    This module encompasses (i) electrical science (fundamental concepts of electrical units and relationships, basic AC & DC circuit theory, digital systems and electro-mechanical machines) and (ii) engineering materials (classification of materials, mechanical and physical properties, structure of materials, testing, materials selection for metals, polymers and ceramics. Please refer to the teaching plan for a more detailed description.

  • Mechanical Science

    This module encompasses statics (fundamental concept of units, forces, force systems, free body diagrams, couples, moments, direct & shear stresses, beams, frames, shear force-bending moment relationships) and dynamics (quantities and concepts, linear & angular motion, non-constant acceleration, forces and torques, moment of inertia, application of free-body diagrams, work-energy equation, impulse-momentum equation, simple harmonic motion, dynamic mechanisms, engineering vibrations).

  • Fluid Mechanics & Thermodynamics

    Properties of liquids and gases, Gauge and absolute pressure. Hydrostatic principles, manometry, forces on immersed surfaces. Definition of types of fluid flow. The mass conservation principle. The Euler-Bernoulli equation. Application of Bernoulli's equation to pipeline problems with energy losses and flow measurement. Momentum equation for steady flow. Dimensional analysis, Buckingham's method, non-dimensional coefficients. The concept of a thermodynamic system, open and closed. Thermodynamic processes. Zeroth Law and concept of temperature. Thermodynamic work and heat, their equivalence and energy transfer. First law of thermodynamics, definition of internal energy and enthalpy. The specific heat capacities of perfect gases and their relevance to isentropic processes.

  • Engineering Mathematics

    The module builds on from A-Level mathematics (or equivalent qualification) to provide mathematical techniques required for engineering. The module includes the manipulation and applications of elementary functions (trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential), complex numbers, Boolean algebra and the techniques of differentiation and integration for functions of one variable. Refer to the teaching plan for a more detailed description.

  • Engineering Applications of Mathematics

    The module follows on from the module 4PAM1007 Engineering Mathematics to provide further mathematical techniques required for applications in Engineering disciplines. The module includes the techniques associated with the manipulation of matrices and vectors, evaluation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, development of power series approximations of elementary mathematical functions, techniques for the solution of ordinary differential equations and the principles of probability and data handling. The mathematics material will be supported using a suitable software package, for example MATLAB, and will also be used to solve engineering problems. Refer to the teaching plan for a more detailed description.

Optional

  • Motorsport and Automotive Technology

    * engines: types, layouts and basic dimensions and effects on engine performance; * fuels including bio-fuels and hydrogen; * engine control systems; * materials especially where specific properties are required in the engine components; * thermodynamics: basic indicator diagrams and factors affecting performance; * calibration: practical engine mapping with emphasis on theory and practice; * chassis: methods of construction and basic parameters such as torsional stiffness, COG; * suspension and steering: Resume of different suspension types and their relative merits in terms such as cost, complexity, performance. Basic theory such as the effects of camber angle, scrub radius, damping, anti roll, squat, dive, load transfer; * tyres: basic terms and their practical significance, eg slip angle, tractive force, traction circles, camber thrust; * introduction to motorsports. What actually goes on at the race track and what preparation is needed to get there. The requirements for racing vehicles and their setup.

  • Fundamentals of Motorsport Technology

    - Engines: types, layouts and basic dimensions and effects on engine performance - Fuels including bio-fuels and hydrogen -Engine control systems -Materials expecially where specific properties are required in the engine components -Thermodynamics: basic indicator diagrams and factors affecting performance -Calibration: methods of construction and basic parameers such as torsional stiffness, COG -Suspension and steering: resume of different suspension types and their relative merits in terms such as cost, complexity, performance. Basic theory such as the effects of camber angle, scrub radius, damping, anti-roll, squat, dive, load transfer -Tyres: basic terms and their practical significance. eg slip angle, tractive force, traction circles, camber thrust -Introduction to motorsports. What actually goes on at the race track and what preparation is needed to get there. The requirements for racing vehicles and their setup.

Year 2

Core Modules

  • Career Planning

    This module will encourage students to reflect on their career aspirations and review/plan for the development of appropriate skills necessary to realise these aspirations. Many students will specifically use this module to prepare for the optional professional placement year. Students who undertake the placement will work within industry or a commercial organisation that is able to provide an appropriate learning experience within an engineering environment. This placement must be of at least 48 weeks duration. To be eligible for placement students must have passed the progression requirements to level 6

  • Structural Mechanics

    This module includes shear force-bending moment diagrams, beam theory, combined loading conditions, direct stress/strain, shear stress/strain, torsion of shafts, bending stresses in beams with unsymmetrical sections, and power transmission.

  • Dynamics

    This module will further expand the students understanding of the basic dynamics principles covered in year 1 to include rotational motion in mechanical systems and the dynamic response to applied forces. Through a combination of case studies presented in lectures, experiments and tutorial activities students will develop their ability to analyse the dynamic behaviour of mechanical systems including an introduction vibrational analysis and how to dampen the effect of vibration.

  • Data Acquisition and Control Systems

    This module covers sensors and actuators in the context of how devices are interfaced rather than to how they are designed. Analogue circuits used for interfacing sensors and actuators are also studied, together with analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue conversion. This module also introduces students to the concepts of linear closed loop control systems and the simulation of the dynamic performance using the Control Systems Toolbox in Matlab. Techniques include step response and frequency response methods to predict steady state and stability performance. Students will also be introduced to simple series controller design.

  • Project Management and Product Development

    To achieve and maintain market position the manufacturing industry must develop profitable and competitive products in time, to quality and within budget. This requires the functions of the company to be organised to achieve common objectives. This module examines the organisational aspects of product development from definition through design to manufacture. The team issues and techniques of project management are addressed as applicable to the product development process and in general terms. The project management content is taught first in order to support the product development content.

  • Integrated Engineering Systems Design

    This module will introduce the concept of integrated engineering system design to products. The main thrust of the module is to provide an understanding of common existing engineering systems such as hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical systems, and to show how many products in the market contain multi-systems within. The module will look at the system level interface with users of the product, via controls and feedback. The students via design assignments will be asked to top level system design a product comprising of various systems. The system design will be driven by a technical specification and some conceptual and feasibility work. The students will be expected to produce a system design flow chart for a product which shows the interactions, inputs and outputs between the various systems of the product. Some design engineering calculations will be performed at the system interface level.

  • Thermofluid Mechanics

    This module is a single unit of study, covering both Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. The proportioning between these two is approximately 2/3:1/3. The thermofluid mechanics syllabus covers: - the second law of thermodynamics; - viscous flow systems for incompressible fluids; - the nature and behaviour of semi-perfect gases, gaseous mixtures and 3-phase pure substances; - water/steam fundamentals and applications to power systems; - consideration of a range of practical applications of fluid power cycles; - flow round immersed objects, cross stream forces.

  • Further Engineering Mathematics

    The module follows on from the mathematics modules at Level 4 to provide further mathematical techniques required for applications in Engineering disciplines. The module includes numerical methods for ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, Fourier series, line and double integrals, as well as s using a suitable software applications package to solve engineering problems. Emphasis is put on techniques and applications rather than complete mathematical rigour.

Optional

  • Career Planning

    This module will encourage students to reflect on their career aspirations and review/plan for the development of appropriate skills necessary to realise these aspirations. Many students will specifically use this module to prepare for the optional professional placement year. Students who undertake the placement will work within industry or a commercial organisation that is able to provide an appropriate learning experience within an engineering environment. This placement must be of at least 48 weeks duration. To be eligible for placement students must have passed the progression requirements to level 6

  • Structural Mechanics

    This module includes shear force-bending moment diagrams, beam theory, combined loading conditions, direct stress/strain, shear stress/strain, torsion of shafts, bending stresses in beams with unsymmetrical sections, and power transmission.

  • Dynamics

    This module will further expand the students understanding of the basic dynamics principles covered in year 1 to include rotational motion in mechanical systems and the dynamic response to applied forces. Through a combination of case studies presented in lectures, experiments and tutorial activities students will develop their ability to analyse the dynamic behaviour of mechanical systems including an introduction vibrational analysis and how to dampen the effect of vibration.

  • Data Acquisition and Control Systems

    This module covers sensors and actuators in the context of how devices are interfaced rather than to how they are designed. Analogue circuits used for interfacing sensors and actuators are also studied, together with analogue-to-digital and digital-to-analogue conversion. This module also introduces students to the concepts of linear closed loop control systems and the simulation of the dynamic performance using the Control Systems Toolbox in Matlab. Techniques include step response and frequency response methods to predict steady state and stability performance. Students will also be introduced to simple series controller design.

  • Project Management and Product Development

    To achieve and maintain market position the manufacturing industry must develop profitable and competitive products in time, to quality and within budget. This requires the functions of the company to be organised to achieve common objectives. This module examines the organisational aspects of product development from definition through design to manufacture. The team issues and techniques of project management are addressed as applicable to the product development process and in general terms. The project management content is taught first in order to support the product development content.

  • Integrated Engineering Systems Design

    This module will introduce the concept of integrated engineering system design to products. The main thrust of the module is to provide an understanding of common existing engineering systems such as hydraulic, pneumatic, electrical systems, and to show how many products in the market contain multi-systems within. The module will look at the system level interface with users of the product, via controls and feedback. The students via design assignments will be asked to top level system design a product comprising of various systems. The system design will be driven by a technical specification and some conceptual and feasibility work. The students will be expected to produce a system design flow chart for a product which shows the interactions, inputs and outputs between the various systems of the product. Some design engineering calculations will be performed at the system interface level.

  • Computer Aided Engineering

    This module introduces the students to three CAE systems, CAD solid modelling, stress analysis and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) each with an equal weighting. The CAD component of this module enhances skills in solid modelling and shows the benefits and potential of 3D models in the design process. The stress analysis component introduces the concept of extracting the mid-surface of a solid CAD model and the various techniques to ensure that the surfaces are fully joined. Techniques for ensuring water-tightness and avoidance of initial penetration will also be introduced. The types of element to be used for any particular problem will be discussed. The effect of mesh density on the accuracy of the results will be looked at by using a classical engineering problem. Both static and modal analysis will be covered and reinforced by experimental tests. The CFD component introduces the concept of discretisation of the governing equations of fluid mechanics and covers setting up simple flow scenarios and geometries. Analysis is carried out with a view to parameters affecting result sensitivity.

  • Thermofluid Mechanics

    This module is a single unit of study, covering both Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics. The proportioning between these two is approximately 2/3:1/3. The thermofluid mechanics syllabus covers: - the second law of thermodynamics; - viscous flow systems for incompressible fluids; - the nature and behaviour of semi-perfect gases, gaseous mixtures and 3-phase pure substances; - water/steam fundamentals and applications to power systems; - consideration of a range of practical applications of fluid power cycles; - flow round immersed objects, cross stream forces.

Year 3

Core Modules

  • Industrial Placement

    The optional professional placement year is undertaken between the second and final years of study. Students undertake the placement within a commercial organisation that is able to provide an appropriate learning experience within an engineering environment. The placement must be of at least 48 weeks duration though many students will complete a year or more at the company. To be eligible for placement students must have achieved sufficient credit at Levels 4 and 5 to be able to enter the final year upon completion of the placement. While the faculty/school actively supports the placements process ultimately it is the placement company that will select students, normally through an interview process. During the placement a member of the academic staff will be assigned to the student as a tutor and will monitor the student's progress during the placement period.

Optional

Year 4

Core Modules

  • Thermofluid Mechanics & Heat Transfer

    Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer - Steady state conduction heat transfer. Natural and forced convection. Heat transfer by a conduction. Overall heat transfer coefficient through multiple conductors. Thermal radiation and concepts of black and grey bodies. Stefan-Boltzmann constant and radiation heat transfer estimation. Principle of combustion. Laminar and turbulent flames. Combustion chemistry and calculations. Wet and dry analysis of combustion products. Gas power cycles. Joule-Brayton cycle. Real gas turbine cycle and its performance parameters. Reciprocating internal combustion engine cycles. Processes forming the Otto, diesel and dual cycles and performance parameters. Engines emission, major pollutants and methods of pollutants reduction. Turbo and super charging internal combustion engines. Fluid Mechanics - Isentropic compressible flow in ducts. Subsonic and supersonic flow. Normal shock, oblique shock, and expansion waves.

  • Control Systems

    This module will further the students understanding of classical control theory and give the experience of applying the theory to modify the dynamic performance of systems. The module will introduce root locus methods for the design of series controllers, in both continuous and digitally controlled systems. The module will also extend the students understanding of frequency response methods into the design of controllers and the analysis of non-linear systems using describing functions to predict limit cycles. Where possible students will be encouraged to use Matlab to check theoretical calculations and to design controllers.

  • Mechanical Engineering Design

    This module aims to provide a realistic experience of a major design project, spanning the initial client brief through to the presentation of detailed design proposals. It affords the opportunity to develop engineering competence by applying a wide range of academic studies to the development of a viable product. The module comprises a series of substantial and related design projects, done in teams of typically 4-5. Teamwork, project management, and the use of appropriate computer design tools are inherent to the course. The products may vary most years, but will be selected so as to be challenging and include a measure of social awareness.

  • Vibration, Noise & Vehicle Dynamics

    This module aims to provide an understanding of: (i) vibration and dynamic responses of complex mechanical engineering systems and structures, this includes normal modes of vibration of both two and multi-degree of freedom systems. The forced response of these systems subject to harmonic excitations is also evaluated. The response of simple systems subject to random excitation is considered too. (ii) the nature of noise and to achieve the ability to measure, specify and analyse noise spectra. It encompasses vibration modelling of complex mechanical engineering systems and structures and their dynamic responses, and also noise control which is the analysis to limit and control the levels of noise emitted by machines/vehicles. Principles of noise absorption and techniques of noise control are examined with particular reference to internal vehicle noise/room acoustics. (iii) modelling and analysing the effects of dynamic excitation on the handling, ride, vibration and noise responses of a vehicle. Vehicle suspension dynamic characteristics are examined with reference to the ride qualities of vehicles. The lateral handling characteristics of a simple vehicle model are examined, and its steady state responses are analysed.

  • Mechanics and Properties of Materials

    1.Plate theory: bending of thin plates subjected to pressure loading. 2.Elasticity & Plasticity 3.Composite Materials 4.Viscoelasticity: creep and relaxation 5.Fracture and Fatigue 6.Corrosion 7.Non-Destructive Testing

  • Individual Project

    The major project in the fourth year of study can take several forms ranging from design oriented work to investigative work. The project title and topic are chosen to provide intellectual challenge appropriate to an honours programme of study. The student is expected to firstly identify and elucidate the problems, then to plan and execute a relevant programme of work. Assessment is ongoing through the project via an individual supervisor, culminating with a comprehensive report of work done. Students would normally be expected to register their interest in the area of work, but are encouraged to suggest their own projects where appropriate.

Optional

  • Thermofluid Mechanics & Heat Transfer

    Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer - Steady state conduction heat transfer. Natural and forced convection. Heat transfer by a conduction. Overall heat transfer coefficient through multiple conductors. Thermal radiation and concepts of black and grey bodies. Stefan-Boltzmann constant and radiation heat transfer estimation. Principle of combustion. Laminar and turbulent flames. Combustion chemistry and calculations. Wet and dry analysis of combustion products. Gas power cycles. Joule-Brayton cycle. Real gas turbine cycle and its performance parameters. Reciprocating internal combustion engine cycles. Processes forming the Otto, diesel and dual cycles and performance parameters. Engines emission, major pollutants and methods of pollutants reduction. Turbo and super charging internal combustion engines. Fluid Mechanics - Isentropic compressible flow in ducts. Subsonic and supersonic flow. Normal shock, oblique shock, and expansion waves.

  • Control Systems

    This module will further the students understanding of classical control theory and give the experience of applying the theory to modify the dynamic performance of systems. The module will introduce root locus methods for the design of series controllers, in both continuous and digitally controlled systems. The module will also extend the students understanding of frequency response methods into the design of controllers and the analysis of non-linear systems using describing functions to predict limit cycles. Where possible students will be encouraged to use Matlab to check theoretical calculations and to design controllers.

  • Mechanical Engineering Design

    This module aims to provide a realistic experience of a major design project, spanning the initial client brief through to the presentation of detailed design proposals. It affords the opportunity to develop engineering competence by applying a wide range of academic studies to the development of a viable product. The module comprises a series of substantial and related design projects, done in teams of typically 4-5. Teamwork, project management, and the use of appropriate computer design tools are inherent to the course. The products may vary most years, but will be selected so as to be challenging and include a measure of social awareness.

  • Manufacturing Strategy

    The module argues for the case of a modern systems approach to manufacturing strategy, and describes the competitive environment that faces manufacturing in Britain today e.g. Globalisation. An important aim of the module is seen as placing the manufacturing systems in its proper perspective at the centre of the companies manufacturing strategy. The module will also serve a duel purpose i.e. to broaden the perspective of the manufacturing function, and to heighten the awareness of other functional critical areas involved in the task of formulating a successful manufacturing strategy.

  • Vibration, Noise & Vehicle Dynamics

    This module aims to provide an understanding of: (i) vibration and dynamic responses of complex mechanical engineering systems and structures, this includes normal modes of vibration of both two and multi-degree of freedom systems. The forced response of these systems subject to harmonic excitations is also evaluated. The response of simple systems subject to random excitation is considered too. (ii) the nature of noise and to achieve the ability to measure, specify and analyse noise spectra. It encompasses vibration modelling of complex mechanical engineering systems and structures and their dynamic responses, and also noise control which is the analysis to limit and control the levels of noise emitted by machines/vehicles. Principles of noise absorption and techniques of noise control are examined with particular reference to internal vehicle noise/room acoustics. (iii) modelling and analysing the effects of dynamic excitation on the handling, ride, vibration and noise responses of a vehicle. Vehicle suspension dynamic characteristics are examined with reference to the ride qualities of vehicles. The lateral handling characteristics of a simple vehicle model are examined, and its steady state responses are analysed.

  • Mechanics and Properties of Materials

    1.Plate theory: bending of thin plates subjected to pressure loading. 2.Elasticity & Plasticity 3.Composite Materials 4.Viscoelasticity: creep and relaxation 5.Fracture and Fatigue 6.Corrosion 7.Non-Destructive Testing

  • Individual Project

    The major project in the fourth year of study can take several forms ranging from design oriented work to investigative work. The project title and topic are chosen to provide intellectual challenge appropriate to an honours programme of study. The student is expected to firstly identify and elucidate the problems, then to plan and execute a relevant programme of work. Assessment is ongoing through the project via an individual supervisor, culminating with a comprehensive report of work done. Students would normally be expected to register their interest in the area of work, but are encouraged to suggest their own projects where appropriate.

  • Careers Portfolio

    This module will help students identify the employability skills necessary to enter their chosen profession. They will be required to develop a portfolio that evidences the following employability skills relevant for their chosen profession, from a combination of employment experience and academic modules. Skills include; Self Management and Development, Team Working, Communicating, Specialist Technologies, Professional Awareness and Problem Solving/Creativity.

  • Micro-Engineering & Micro-Technology

    The Microengineering & Microtechnology module provides both mechanical and electrical engineers with a base understanding of the principles required for innovative, integrated microengineering design and manufacture. The core of the module is a case study led group project focusing on the design of a microfluidic pump. The individual members of the project groups are designated responsibility for a specific aspect of the overall pump design. This can include: " Structural design and modelling (stress/strain, bond strength, FEA modelling); " Fluidic and flow regime analysis (scaling, CFD modelling); " Electronic control (scaling, piezo drivers).

Fees & funding

Fees 2014

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,000 for the 2014 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged on a modular basis. The cost is £1,125 for each 15-credit module

International Students

Full time: £10,600 for the 2014 academic year

Discounts are available for International students if payment is made in full at registration

View detailed information about tuition fees

Scholarships

Find out more about scholarships for UK/EU and international students

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2014

Start DateEnd DateLink
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time)
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2015

Start DateEnd DateLink
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time)
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)