Clare Tamsitt

Meet Clare Tamsitt who had decided to take a new career path. She is currently the General Manager for Medicine & Therapies at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust.

Current job roleGeneral Manager
Year of graduation2018
Course of studyMasters of Business Administration

A change of path

Before studying the MBA at the University of Hertfordshire, Clare Tamsitt had already spent twenty years doing nursing and commercial work, and had returned to her career in the NHS. Clare admits she came to a crossroads during this time.  She was really passionate about working for the NHS, but she wanted to develop her management skills and progress her career. It was recommended to Clare by a current MBA student, that she should consider doing an MBA. Clare says, ‘I didn’t know the direction I was wanting to go in. Then I decided to take the student’s advise and put in my appraisal that I’d like to do an MBA. I had an interview with Denise (previous MBA Programme Director) and attended one of the information evenings and the rest is history!’

University experience

Clare says she decided to look at Hertfordshire Business School to study her MBA as she has ‘a soft spot for the University since doing [her] nursing diploma.’ She completed her nursing diploma and a Masters in Leadership and Tissue Viability at the University of Hertfordshire, and reveals that she has always been fond of the University.

The MBA teaches important skills that are applicable to everyday life and valuable to business. Clare says, ‘The MBA has stretched my thinking and takes you out of your comfort zone. I learnt more about perspective and what other people do. For example, I wasn’t sure what HR did or even what Finance did. I have taken a lot away in terms of listening and understanding other people’s roles. Most importantly, to think things through. The MBA makes you step back and helps you to make better decisions. That is only a small bit though.  It has definitely changed my approach.’

Clare describes working and studying alongside different people as ‘invaluable’. She explains, ‘Sometimes you can live in a ‘bubble’ in the NHS or commercial sector, or wherever you are working. I liked the fact that there was only one other NHS individual in the cohort. You do think to yourself that everyone is so different but when you look at the crux of the key problems with HR for example, or even Finance, you could come together and explore and expand on a lot of examples. It made you think about different settings.’

The MBA encourages debate and practical application, but it can also be academically demanding and time consuming. Clare notes that there are some implications of the longer hours that come with the programme. However, she says, ‘I am not sure I would do anything differently. Be organised and juggle your time so you can kind of have the best of both worlds. Just juggle it and manage your time. Don’t leave things till the last minute. Do it in bite size pieces. With everything else in terms of work, studies, life and family, it’s just that you have to plan it.'

The future

Clare has not long passed her MBA and is now working in the NHS as a General Manager, specifically a Divisional General manager working on the operational side, at the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital. She is also a visiting lecturer at the University of Hertfordshire. She encourages others to consider the MBA. She says, ‘Do it. It’s hard and you have to juggle but if you are thinking about doing it and you’ve got the passion and want to learn then I’d say do it.’

‘Sometimes you can live in a ‘bubble’ in the NHS or commercial sector, or wherever you are working. I liked the fact that there was only one other NHS individual in the cohort. You do think to yourself that everyone is so different but when you look at the crux of the key problems with HR for example, or even Finance, you could come together and explore and expand on a lot of examples. It made you think about different settings.’