Sport and Exercise Science BSc (Hons)

About the course

1/

First year

You will study modules in: anatomy and biomechanics, sport and exercise psychology, physiology, fitness training, nutrition, and strength and conditioning as well as applied laboratory practicals. You can also take additional qualifications such as the ACSM fitness instructor’s course.

Second year

Core modules include: exercise physiology and testing, sport and exercise psychology, biomechanics, applied nutrition, and research design.

Work placement/study abroad year

An optional placement year working in key sport science areas such as support for sports’ clubs, exercise physiology for health in hospitals and working with athletes. Although optional, it is likely to help you achieve a better class of degree, and improve your employability prospects when you graduate. Alternatively you can study abroad at one of our partner universities.

Final year

If you do not go on a work placement year, you can take a work experience module in your Final Year to support both your studies and your CV. A major part of this year is a research project where you will develop an experimental design, recruit and test volunteers and produce a dissertation in an exciting range of areas from which to choose.

You can tailor your degree to suit your interests and strengths through having free choice of any of the taught modules offered. Areas of study include: exercise performance and health physiology, strength and conditioning, sports nutrition and ergogenic aids, advanced sports and exercise psychology and biomechanics.

Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks may be undertaken.

Why choose this course?

This course is all about the study and application of scientific aspects of sport and exercise, including physiology, psychology, biomechanics, nutrition, strength and conditioning and biochemistry. The emphasis is not only on understanding and improving individuals’ and/or teams’ sporting performance, but also on the role of exercise in health and well-being.

Download the course leaflet for BSc Sport and Exercise Science

Entry requirements...

280 UCAS points to include one Science A Level. Acceptable Science A levels - Human Biology, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sports Science and PE or BTEC Nationals (NQF/QCF) Extended Diploma in Sport & Exercise Science or Applied Science only.

GCSE Maths, English Language and Double Science at grade C.

Study routes

  • Full Time, 3 Years
  • Part Time, 5 Years
  • Sandwich, 4 Years

Locations

  • University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield

Careers

Our graduates progress to a wide range of careers which reflects the multidisciplinary nature of the degree programme.

Job titles of recent graduates include:

Community Rugby Coach, Sports Lecturer, Police Officer, NHS Trainee Cardiac Physiologist, Special Needs Coach, Strength and Conditioning Coach, Fire Brigade Fitness Advisor, Health and Fitness Coach, IT Support Officer, Learning Support Assistant, PE Technician, Personal Trainer/Gym Instructor, Pharmaceutical Production Technician, Sport Science Support Officer, Lecturer in Sport Science in Further Education, Physiotherapy Assistant, Fitness Instructor, Recreation Assistant, Swimming Coach, Lifestyle Consultant, and Mental Health Physical Activity and Nutrition Advisor.

Examples of recent employers are the NHS, the English Institute of Sport, Lucozade Sport, and Mind.

Teaching methods

Our staff have high level of expertise and experience, with many of them accredited/chartered with professional organisations such as the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences - BASES, and the British Psychological Society - BPS.

BASES is a nationally recognised achievement, whereby the standards of operation, physiological testing, and laboratory management are assessed in relation to recognised clinical criteria and quality control. This successful accreditation is proof of our staff demonstrating high standards in operation.

Staff are also research and/or consultancy active ensuring that they remain at the forefront of developing their respective specialism and that our students are entwined in historical and contemporary debate and investigation.

Our students typically spend 8 hours a week in lectures, and 8 hours a week in practical laboratory sessions, workshops, or seminars. Practical work is an important and significant element of the Sports and Exercise Science degree, and the high levels of competence and independence demonstrated by our students in the laboratory enables them to become 'thinkers' and 'doers'.

Most modules are assessed by 50% coursework and 50% examination. The type of coursework is varied, depending on the module and includes essays, reports, practical write-ups, posters and seminar presentations.

Our laboratories boast an enviable range of performance testing equipment (e.g. Metalaysers for VO2 max testing; blood taking facilities and blood analysers to measure blood lactate and cholesterol; running treadmills; cycling and rowing ergometers; Dynamometers, Anthropometric equipment; weight-lifting equipment, and even an indoor putting green for psychological and biomechanical analysis).

Throughout your time at the University you work closely with a personal tutor in order to help develop academic, personal, and vocational skills. This work is supported by the University intranet (Studynet) which provides a location for lecture notes, study guides, assessment details, example exam papers, and discussion forums amongst other things.

You also have 24-hour access (during term-time) to two outstanding learning resources centres.

Work Placement

Our graduates have gained employment with elite athletes, professional sports teams, health clubs and within the National Health Service. Also, in the leisure industry, military, fire service and as coaches. They have progressed to study for a Master’s degree, PhD or teacher training qualification.
 

Professional Accreditations

BASES Accreditation

This is a nationally recognised achievement, whereby the standards of operation, physiological testing, and laboratory management are assessed in relation to recognised clinical criteria and quality control. This successful accreditation is proof of our staff demonstrating high standards in operation.

Structure

Year 1

Core Modules

  • Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology

    Psychology is increasingly seen as an important aspect in sport and exercise participation, and as such it plays an integral part in the programme in Sport and Exercise Science. The module introduces students to the field of sport and exercise psychology by defining the nature and scope of the field as well as identifying the fundamental principles that underpin cognition, emotion and behaviour in sport, exercise and physical activity settings. The first part of the module will cover some of the core topics and underlying theories relevant to sport psychology: arousal, stress and anxiety, confidence, team dynamics, motivation, and an introduction to counselling skills. The second part of the module will cover some of the core topics and underlying theories relevant to exercise psychology: exercise determinants and barriers, exercise efficacy, and models of exercise behaviour change.

  • Foundations of Nutrition

    This module introduces students to basic components of human nutrition and health. The module involves the study of human digestion and absorption, as well as the underpinning knowledge of the key macro and micro nutrients in the diet. An introduction to basic metabolism and hormonal control is also covered.

  • Personal Transferable Skills 1 - Sports

    Students will complete assignments, within their discipline of choice, that include opportunities for development of their personal transferable skills. They will reflect on their development with the assistance of a personal tutor and will produce a portfolio of evidence based on the set assignments and wider experience such as from the work place or other areas of responsibility. Skills assessed are: autonomy - taking responsibility for themselves (A), group working (GW), oral and written communication (COM), information management (IM), problem solving (PS), numeracy (NUM), self evaluation and reflective practice (SERP)

  • Study & Research Methods

    This module primarily provides an introduction to the academic and communication skills that students will require to become effective learners in Higher Education. It has also been designed to give students an introduction to the LRC and IT. It is concerned with the acquisition of fundamental academic skills, awareness of basic research methods, data analysis and presentation, approaches to reading appropriate source material and academic standards of referencing. It will involve the use of journal searches linked to academic writing. Sport/exercise related research will be examined with the help of study skills including written and oral communication of issues. Applied mathematics related to the study of sport/exercise and application of computer software packages linked to basic statistics will also be studied. Overall, this module provides the foundations which will be built upon at later stages in order for students to develop into effective and reflective learners.

  • Foundations of Human Physiology

    Foundations of Human Physiology will provide students with an introduction to human physiology applied particularly to sport and exercise. In particular, this module will involve fundamentals of structure, function and biochemistry from cellular, to tissue,organ, and organism levels. A basic understanding of muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine and nervous systems will be developed. There will some coverage of applied sporting topics of relevance to physiology, such as the principles of training and periodicity, and the design of training programmes. Practical work will used to provide additional insight into specific physiological systems.

  • Principles of Exercise Testing and Prescription

    This module follows guidelines outlined by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES). This module explores areas of exercise testing and prescription as applied to healthy and athletic populations. Theoretical content will cover the following key areas: aerobic and anaerobic training, metabolism and use of energy systems, basic physiological responses to exercise, metabolic and physiological calculations, and principles of training adaptations. Additionally aspects of strength, speed, power, flexibility, agility, body composition, and exercise testing (including screening, and risk stratification) will be explored. Practical work associated with this module will include: laboratory health and safety; first aid; measurement error; sub-maximal exercise testing; strength, speed and power assessment; body composition;flexibility assessment; and problem-based learning relating to design of training programmes and metabolic calculations.

  • Anatomy and Biomechanics

    The module has been designed to give students an introduction to human anatomy and biomechanics, relating to structures, properties and functions of bones, joints, tendons, ligaments and muscle in relation to the physical laws which govern human movement. The axial and appendicular skeleton will be studied in regard to joint type and associated movements, while the skeletal muscle system will be analysed in terms of the origins and insertions of selected muscles and the movement they produce. Human movement will be studied in terms of the basic variables and units associated with concepts in linear kinematics and kinetics, including calculations and quantification of human movement. Measurements of human movement (goniometry), muscle mechanics and human stability/mobility will be explored, while biomechanics and injury will be introduced.

  • Foundations of Human Physiology

    Foundations of Human Physiology will provide students with an introduction to human physiology applied to sport and exercise. In particular, this module will involve fundamentals of structure, function and biochemistry from cellular, to tissue, organ, and organism levels. A basic understanding of muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive, endocrine and nervous systems will be developed. There will some coverage of applied sporting topics of relevance to physiology, such as the principles of training and periodicity, and the design of training programmes. Practical work will used to provide additional insight into specific physiological systems. Practical work will include instruction in the use of physiological interfaces, transducers, and recording and analytical software, basic studies on the respiratory (spirometry and off-line techniques) and cardio-vascular system (ECG and blood pressure) and measurement of spinal reflexes and reaction times.

  • Foundations of Exercise Training and Testing

    This module will develop the key theoretical and practical skills essential for sport and exercise scientists. The module centres around the conceptual exploration of responses and adaptations to aerobic exercise, as well as activities involving strength, speed, flexibility and power. The module also introduces students to the basic principles of energy systems and metabolic pathways pertinent to exercise training. Through the awareness of key concepts of training principles, this module additionally aims to develop an understanding of the basic design of training programmes in line with expected physiological adaptations. It also aims to develop essential practical skills in undertaking a basic fitness assessment, including heart rate, blood pressure, body composition and submaximal exercise evaluation.

  • Foundations of Nutrition

    This module introduces students to basic components of human nutrition, with applications to sport, health and exercise. The module involves the study of human digestion and absorption, including aspects of endocrine control of metabolism. There is also an introduction to essential themes underlying dietary macro- and micro-nutrients, and explores basic applications of nutrition pertinent to dietary assessment and problem-based learning scenarios.

  • Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

    The module introduces students to the field of sport and exercise psychology by defining the nature and scope of the field as well as identifying the fundamental principles that underpin cognition, emotion and behaviour in sport, exercise and physical activity settings. The module will cover some of the core topics and underlying theories relevant to sport psychology: e.g. arousal, stress and anxiety, confidence, and motivation. Also, the module will cover some of the core topics and underlying theories relevant to exercise psychology: e.g. exercise determinants and barriers, mental health, and models of exercise behaviour change. The module will also introduce reflective practice, counselling skills, and processes relating to professional practice.

  • Foundations of Anatomy and Biomechanics

    The module provides an introduction to human anatomy and biomechanics, relating to structures, properties and functions of bones, joints, tendons, ligaments and muscle, in relation to the mechanical principles which govern human movement. The axial and appendicular skeleton will be studied in regard to joint type and associated movements, while the skeletal muscle system will be investigated in terms of the origins and insertions of selected muscles and the movement they produce. Human movement will be studied in terms of the basic variables and units associated with concepts in both linear and angular kinematics and kinetics, including calculations and quantification of human movement.

  • Graduate and Professional Skills 1: Sport & Exercise Science

    Students will complete assignments, within their discipline of choice, that include opportunities for development of their transferable graduate and professional skills. They will reflect on their development with the assistance of a personal tutor and will produce a portfolio of evidence based on the set assignments and wider experience such as from the work place or other areas of responsibility. Skills assessed are: autonomy - taking responsibility for themselves (A), group working (GW), oral and written communication (COM), information management (IM), problem solving (PS), numeracy (NUM), self-evaluation and reflective practice (SERP). Students will also document their continued professional development, such as the gaining of additional qualifications, work experience or attendance at external events such as conferences or workshops

Optional

Year 2

Core Modules

  • Applied Testing and Training in Sport and Exercise

    This module builds on previous study within the course and involves an examination of the exercise physiology assessment processes and conditioning practices with reference to relevant supporting theory and literature. It aims to develop applied knowledge and experience of testing in different environments through the undertaking a series of assessments which will improve the students theoretical understanding and practical application of testing and training the performer. This module is designed to introduce the Level 5 sport and exercise science student to a range of relevant themes that can supplement other knowledge from the course and inform the exercise professional when working with a client.

  • Applied Nutrition for Health and Physical Activity

    This module follows on from theoretical and practical aspects of human nutrition introduced at level 4, with a focus on how nutrition can be beneficial for health and aspects of physical activity. The module involves a deeper exploration of the physiological processes of human digestion, absorption and metabolism, with reference to the macro-nutrients in particular. Additionally, implications of hormonal and enzymatic regulation of metabolic pathways under different conditions will be explored. The module also aims to introduce topics pertinent to the scientific evaluation of the beneficial effects of nutrition on human health and physical activity. Students undertaking this module will also develop key skills pertinent to case study evaluation, reflective practice and nutritional programme implementation.

  • Exercise Physiology

    Cardiovascular aspects of exercise, blood pressure and haemodynamic response at rest and exercise, exercise and cardiovascular disease. Respiratory aspects of exercise: haemoglobin and respiratory variables, acid balance and asthma. Basic laboratory testing in athletes and metabolic responses to training. The endocrine system during exercise, exercise-induced endocrine secretions/catecholamine response. Endocrinology-fluid balance. The immune system and exercise. Fatigue and exhaustion; de-training and the human body. The effect of exercise in different environmental conditions and on different populations such as ageing; energy supply and systems.

  • Applied Biomechanics

    Application of the mechanical principles involved in human movement during sport and exercise will be studied. This includes the role of biomechanics in relation to human gait analysis, objects in flight, aetiology of sporting injury and design of sporting equipment. Practical experience will be gained in how to record and analyse human movement using video and electromyography capture and analysis.

  • Research Design

    In this module students will explore the principles and methods that underpin scientific research in sport and exercise science and sports therapy. The module will enable students to comprehend, critique, and effectively utilise existing scientific research in their studies and professional practice, either as sport and exercise scientists or sport therapists. The knowledge gained will also provide a foundation upon which to design and develop an appropriate research proposal in order to successfully complete the final year project.

  • Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology

    This module is designed to further develop understanding of the psychology of sport, exercise and physical activity behaviour. In the sport psychology component of the module students will be taught the underlying principles of multi-dimensional anxiety and performance, reversal theory, catastrophe theory, psychological skills training, including goal-setting, imagery, self-talk and relaxation. The exercise and health component of the module will focus on the application of theoretical models of behaviour change to exercise motivation and adherence in a health context. In addition, the usefulness of different behavioural change strategies to promote exercise participation and adherence in various population groups will be addressed.

  • Graduate and Professional Skills 2: Sport & Exercise Science

    Students will complete assignments, within their discipline of choice, that include opportunities for development of their transferable graduate and professional skills. They will reflect on their development with the assistance of a personal tutor and will produce a portfolio of evidence based on the set assignments and wider experience such as from the work place or other areas of responsibility. Skills assessed are: autonomy - taking responsibility for themselves (A), group working (GW), oral and written communication (COM), information management (IM), problem solving (PS), numeracy (NUM), self-evaluation and reflective practice (SERP). Students will also document their continued professional development, such as the gaining of additional qualifications, work experience or attendance at external events such as conferences or workshops.

Optional

Year 4

Core Modules

  • Project - Sport and Exercise Science

    The project is intended to offer the student the widest possible scope, within controlled parameters, to record a topic beyond the constraints of usual coursework and examinations. Guidelines on the planning, execution and presentation of projects will be given to all students before the start of level 3 study. These will be backed up by workshops on relevant issues in the projects, such as structuring and writing a literature review and collection and interpretation of data (including statistics). Students will have an individual supervisor to guide them through the project process, with regular contact between student and supervisor required.

  • Applied Independent Research Project

    The Applied Independent Research Project module allows students to design and undertake an individual research study relevant to an area of personal interest and choice. The module follows on from Research Design at Level 5, where students will have undertaken basic planning and preparation for their own research project. In some cases, students will have undertaken the ethical application process ahead of Level 6, although all students will be required to submit an ethics application early into the module. The module allows students to apply and develop their knowledge and skills pertinent to a research area of choice, which encourages independent responsibility to develop a research methodology, undertake data collection and analyse the findings. The module also aims to allow students to develop skills pertinent to critical thinking and interpretation/presentation of underlying data collected.

  • Graduate and Professional Skills 3: Sport & Exercise Science

    Students will complete assignments, within their discipline of choice, that include opportunities for development of their transferable graduate and professional skills. They will reflect on their development with the assistance of a personal tutor and will produce a portfolio of evidence based on the set assignments and wider experience such as from the work place or other areas of responsibility. Skills assessed are: autonomy - taking responsibility for themselves (A), group working (GW), oral and written communication (COM), information management (IM), problem solving (PS), numeracy (NUM), self-evaluation and reflective practice (SERP). Students will also document their continued professional development, such as the gaining of additional qualifications, work experience or attendance at external events such as conferences or workshops

Optional

  • Work Experience in Sport, Health and Exercise

    This module aims to provide opportunities for the student to transfer academic and vocational learning into a work-related setting, and vice versa to bring work-place skills and issues into the academic and vocational learning environment. Thus, the module should help to develop good evidence based working practices, and enhance associated knowledge and skills, with a view to improving both student employability and critical reflective practice.

  • Advanced Exercise Psychology

    The module aims to extend year 2 by demonstrating how the integration of alternative theoretical perspectives might influence practice with regard to specific populations. In particular, there is increasing research evidence that exercise and physical activity might be effective in terms of enhancing psychological health and well-being in different populations. Therefore, the module will examine the relationships between exercise, physical activity, and various indices of psychological health and well-being across various populations. Appropriate theory and literature will be used to explore potential mechanisms of change. Students will study: Effects of exercise on well-being: research design and measurement issues Motivation, and behaviour change, in physical activity contexts Psychology of chronic mental illness Approaches to exercise and physical activity behaviour counselling

  • Advanced Sport Psychology

    This module is designed to develop a critical understanding of theories of sport psychology introduced at level two. In addition, the module has a strong applied element whereby students are made aware of how to effectively deliver such theories so that athletic performance is improved. There is a particular emphasis in this module on the importance of managing the athlete/sport psychologist interaction effectively. Students will cover a number of areas, including framework for consultancy, models of applied sport psychology, athlete assessment, implementation and evaluation of psychological skills programmes, career termination and working with young athletes.

  • Sport and Exercise Nutrition

    Sports nutrition integrates the fields of applied biochemistry, exercise physiology, nutritional and ergogenic aids. The importance of nutrition and ergogenic aids specific to enhancing sports and exercise performance will be demonstrated. This will be implemented through lectures in the areas of: macro and micronutrient requirements; carbohydrates pre, during and post exercise; fluid replacement and electrolyte strategies; importance of proteins to performance; fats for performance; blood alkaliners; diet for the immune system; ergogenic aids including creatine and glutamine.

  • Biomedical Implications of Exercise

    Exercise and the disease state: the role of exercise both as a prophylactic and causative factor in various cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic diseases. More specifically, topics such as the coronary heart disease, haemostasis, dyslipidaemia, sudden cardiac death, obesity, metabolic syndrome diabetes. Furthermore, the role of rehabilitation, regular exercise and increased activity will be addressed with particular emphasis on the above related disease. The role of activity and exercise in the promoting health in diverse groups and conditions such as the elderly, mental health, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS will be covered. In addition, the implementation of exercise prescription in the general population will be examined in the context of health initiatives.

  • Integrative Physiology

    The physical characteristics of a range of environmental situations and the physiological responses to these, with particular reference to exercise in these conditions; hypobaric (diving) and hyperbaric (high altitude and simulated) environments, hypobaric strategies for the enhancement of performance, hot, cold, high and low humidity environments. Space and aviation physiology. Body rhythms and chronobiology, and influences on performance. Limitations of performance, genetic and ethnic influences on performance. Human ageing and the master athlete, the young athlete, physiological and bio-chemical aspects of detraining. Drugs in sport: physiological mechanisms, detrimental effects.

  • Strength and Conditioning

    This module has been designed to allow students to further develop skills related to optimisation of human physical performance. It will involve the screening, monitoring and development of factors that impact on helping or hindering human physical performance. The module aims to look at the scientific rationale behind strength and conditioning practices and help students critique common training modalities, with the aim of developing their own practical skills, supported by a strong scientific rationale. In particular programme periodisation and recovery/injury prevention will be covered, as well as looking at the training modalities which make up concepts in human performance such as strength, power, speed, endurance and flexibility.

  • Advanced Biomechanics

    An integrated approach to biomechanical analysis of human movement during sport and exercise practices will be studied. Analysis methods studied will involve advanced techniques incorporating kinetic and kinematics data, including inverse dynamics, dynamical systems theory and stiffness. Students will also study current special topics as well as developing and evaluating research questions within the field of sport and exercise biomechanics.

  • Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology

    This module will facilitate students in developing an advanced critical understanding of theory, and issues, underpinning sport and exercise psychology introduced at levels four and five. The module has a strong applied element whereby students will examine how to apply such theory to sport, exercise and health performance. For the exercise and health component of the module there is particular emphasis on a client-centred recovery approach, and the importance of managing the client-psychologist professional alliance. Students will address topics that focus upon mental well-being such as various forms of mental illness (e.g. depression, schizophrenia), and exercise as an adjunct therapy. Appropriate theory and literature will also be used to explore potential mechanisms of change. For the sport psychology component, students will be made aware of how to effectively evaluate theory to facilitate athletic performance enhancement. There is particular emphasis on the importance of managing the athlete/sport psychologist interaction effectively. Students will address topics including frameworks for consultancy, models of applied sport psychology, athlete assessment, implementation and evaluation of psychological skills programmes, career termination and working with young athletes. Incorporated within the module will be exploration of ethical issues within professional practice, and ongoing reflective practice.

  • Exercise and Health Promotion

    Exercise and the disease state: the role of exercise both as a prophylactic and causative factor in various cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic diseases. More specifically, topics such as coronary heart disease, haemostasis, dyslipidaemia, sudden cardiac death, obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cancer. Furthermore, the effect of rehabilitation, regular exercise and increased activity will be addressed with particular emphasis on the above related disease. The role of activity and exercise in the promoting health in diverse groups and conditions such as the elderly and mental health will be covered. Furthermore, practical classes will consider evaluation and monitoring of disease states and risks. In addition, the implementation of exercise prescription in the general population will be examined in the context of health initiatives.

  • Sport and Performance Nutrition

    Sport and Performance Nutrition integrates the fields of applied biochemistry, exercise physiology, nutrition for performance and ergogenic aids. This module covers specific nutritional issues relevant to sport including dietary strategies for training, competition (both for the elite and recreational athlete) as well as the importance of nutrition and ergogenic aids specific to enhancing sport and exercise performance which will be demonstrated through practicals, workshops and lectures reviewing current literature. Students will also be provided with an opportunity to critically evaluate the effectiveness of the current supporting theories relevant to sports nutrition and other ergogenic aids. In part, this will be achieved through practical testing of these theories under laboratory controlled conditions.

  • Advanced Testing and Training in Sport and Exercise

    This advanced module aims to integrate students’ knowledge and raise critical awareness of exercise physiology, fitness testing and conditioning practices through an applied field based teaching and learning experience. Building on Applied Testing and Training, students will develop specific client coaching skills and correction of technical aspects associated with strength and conditioning procedures. Students will gain experience of working with differing technologies and develop understanding of precision of measurement associated with data collection from physiological monitoring. The final year module will lead students towards performing at UK industry strength and conditioning industry standards.

  • Work Experience in Sport and Exercise Science

    This module aims to provide opportunities for the student to transfer academic and vocational learning into a work-related setting, and vice versa to bring work-place skills and issues into the academic and vocational learning environment. Thus, the module will help to develop good evidence based working practices, and enhance associated knowledge and skills, with a view to improving both student employability and critical reflective practice.

  • Adaptive and Performance Physiology

    Aspects of advanced respiratory exercise physiology: oxygen uptake kinetics, exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia, occurrence, and possible mechanisms. Related aspects of cardio-vascular physiology, including cardiac drift, and blood pressure regulation. Physiological methods for adaptive change, adaptive proteins and mechanisms of effect, with an emphasis on the functionality of the interactions of molecular biological, cellular and biochemical mechanisms. The physical characteristics and physiological responses to a range of environmental situations including hyperbaric conditions (as in diving), hypobaric and hypoxic conditions (as at high altitude), high and low temperatures, low gravity, and high G forces. Space and aviation physiology. The use of adaptive mechanisms as training strategy for athletic performance. Body rhythm and chronobiology, and influences on athletic performance. Limitations of performance, genetic and ethnic influences on performance. Human ageing and the master athlete, the young athlete, the female athlete, the disabled athlete. Biochemical aspects of detraining. Drugs in sport: physiological mechanisms, detrimental effects.

Year 5

Core Modules

Optional

  • Work Experience in Sport, Health and Exercise

    This module aims to provide opportunities for the student to transfer academic and vocational learning into a work-related setting, and vice versa to bring work-place skills and issues into the academic and vocational learning environment. Thus, the module should help to develop good evidence based working practices, and enhance associated knowledge and skills, with a view to improving both student employability and critical reflective practice.

  • Advanced Exercise Psychology

    The module aims to extend year 2 by demonstrating how the integration of alternative theoretical perspectives might influence practice with regard to specific populations. In particular, there is increasing research evidence that exercise and physical activity might be effective in terms of enhancing psychological health and well-being in different populations. Therefore, the module will examine the relationships between exercise, physical activity, and various indices of psychological health and well-being across various populations. Appropriate theory and literature will be used to explore potential mechanisms of change. Students will study: Effects of exercise on well-being: research design and measurement issues Motivation, and behaviour change, in physical activity contexts Psychology of chronic mental illness Approaches to exercise and physical activity behaviour counselling

  • Advanced Sport Psychology

    This module is designed to develop a critical understanding of theories of sport psychology introduced at level two. In addition, the module has a strong applied element whereby students are made aware of how to effectively deliver such theories so that athletic performance is improved. There is a particular emphasis in this module on the importance of managing the athlete/sport psychologist interaction effectively. Students will cover a number of areas, including framework for consultancy, models of applied sport psychology, athlete assessment, implementation and evaluation of psychological skills programmes, career termination and working with young athletes.

  • Sport and Exercise Nutrition

    Sports nutrition integrates the fields of applied biochemistry, exercise physiology, nutritional and ergogenic aids. The importance of nutrition and ergogenic aids specific to enhancing sports and exercise performance will be demonstrated. This will be implemented through lectures in the areas of: macro and micronutrient requirements; carbohydrates pre, during and post exercise; fluid replacement and electrolyte strategies; importance of proteins to performance; fats for performance; blood alkaliners; diet for the immune system; ergogenic aids including creatine and glutamine.

  • Biomedical Implications of Exercise

    Exercise and the disease state: the role of exercise both as a prophylactic and causative factor in various cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic diseases. More specifically, topics such as the coronary heart disease, haemostasis, dyslipidaemia, sudden cardiac death, obesity, metabolic syndrome diabetes. Furthermore, the role of rehabilitation, regular exercise and increased activity will be addressed with particular emphasis on the above related disease. The role of activity and exercise in the promoting health in diverse groups and conditions such as the elderly, mental health, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS will be covered. In addition, the implementation of exercise prescription in the general population will be examined in the context of health initiatives.

  • Integrative Physiology

    The physical characteristics of a range of environmental situations and the physiological responses to these, with particular reference to exercise in these conditions; hypobaric (diving) and hyperbaric (high altitude and simulated) environments, hypobaric strategies for the enhancement of performance, hot, cold, high and low humidity environments. Space and aviation physiology. Body rhythms and chronobiology, and influences on performance. Limitations of performance, genetic and ethnic influences on performance. Human ageing and the master athlete, the young athlete, physiological and bio-chemical aspects of detraining. Drugs in sport: physiological mechanisms, detrimental effects.

  • Project - Sport and Exercise Science

    The project is intended to offer the student the widest possible scope, within controlled parameters, to record a topic beyond the constraints of usual coursework and examinations. Guidelines on the planning, execution and presentation of projects will be given to all students before the start of level 3 study. These will be backed up by workshops on relevant issues in the projects, such as structuring and writing a literature review and collection and interpretation of data (including statistics). Students will have an individual supervisor to guide them through the project process, with regular contact between student and supervisor required.

Fees & funding

Fees 2014

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,000 for the 2014 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged on a modular basis. The cost is £1,125 for each 15-credit module

International Students

Full time: £10,600 for the 2014 academic year

Discounts are available for International students if payment is made in full at registration

View detailed information about tuition fees

Scholarships

Find out more about scholarships for UK/EU and international students

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2014

Start DateEnd DateLink
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time)
27/09/201431/05/2015Apply online (Part Time)
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
27/09/201424/05/2015Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2015

Start DateEnd DateLink
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time)
27/09/201531/05/2016Apply online (Part Time)
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
27/09/201524/05/2016Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)