BA (Hons) Criminal Justice and Criminology with Optional Sandwich Placement/ Study Abroad

in the School of Law

About the course

1/1

Criminology is the study of the anatomy of a crime, specifically its causes, consequences and costs. Criminal justice, on the other hand, refers to established systems for dealing with crime, specifically detection of crime, detaining of criminals, and criminal prosecution and punishment.

Criminal justice is directly associated with law enforcement.

Students pursuing career opportunities in criminal justice will study the different components of criminal justice and law enforcement systems.

Students pursuing a career as a criminologist will study the behaviour patterns, backgrounds, and sociological trends of criminals.

While both fields are different, criminologists and criminal justice professionals work together in the criminal justice system to thwart crime

Students will:

  • Investigate the nature of crime and criminality and develop an understanding of the various issues, debates, and approaches within the criminal justice system and criminology 
  • Engage with a range of current issues and debates on some of the most pressing social issues of today, such as national security, drug policy and the sex trade
  • Learn ways of using the law to help real people in conflict and advocate for fair, equitable and effective laws and interventions
  • Examine how and why offenders should be punished and explore how society defines and manages crime
  • Be taught research-informed course content so that they develop the skills to carry out their own criminological research, together with a range of other transferable skills
  • Engage with important Criminal Justice contacts – we have close professional relationships with the Hertfordshire Constabulary and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner
  • Be taught by internationally-recognised experts in criminology and draw on their expertise in Criminal Law, Criminal Justice, Human Rights and Legal Procedures, Ethics and Skills
  • Learn the concepts, theories and methods they need to understand the realities of crime and control and the practical skills that will allow them to participate in the criminal justice process

Why choose this course?

At Hertfordshire Law School, we recognise that while you are studying with us, you will want to develop professionally as well as academically. To achieve this we have developed a range of free accredited courses, designed to improve the skills needed for a great career in Criminal Justice and Criminology.  

  • Get the best possible start to your career – with 92.2% of Hertfordshire Law School graduates in employment or further study within six months of graduating*
  • Benefit from outstanding and innovative research-led teaching – 65.4% of our students earn 1st class or 2:1 honours degrees
  • Stand out and earn extra qualifications by getting involved in criminal justice activities such as; Trial Advocacy, Police Officer Shadowing, Independent Custody Visiting and Stop and Search Scrutiny Panel Membership


    * Data sourced from 2015/16 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

Entry requirements...

2017 entry 

UCAS are introducing a new tariff for 2017 entry so the points being asked for are substantially different to previous years

112 UCAS points 

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above (with the remaining points to come from a combination of HL, SL and Core).

GCSE Maths and English Language at grade 4 or above (Grade C or above under the old grading structure).

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.0 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band. 

If you do not have the required IELTS or equivalent for direct entry on to your degree programme, our Pre-sessional English and International Foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

For country specific qualifications, please visit our Your Country page.

2018 entry

96 - 112 UCAS points 

GCSE Maths and English Language at grade 4 or above (Grade C in English Language and Grade D in Maths under the old grading structure)

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above (with the remaining points to come from a combination of HL, SL and Core).

2018 entry

96 - 112 UCAS points 

GCSE Maths and English Language at grade 4 or above (Grade C in English Language and Grade D in Maths under the old grading structure)

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above (with the remaining points to come from a combination of HL, SL and Core).

Careers

Graduates can pursue a range of careers, working within the field of criminal justice and beyond. The opportunities are endless but just to name a few you could end up working within the police, probation, youth offending or prison services, crime prevention and criminological research, or the forensic science services.

Students also have access to the University's Careers, Employment and Enterprise Service who can help you with seeking work experience, applying for jobs or starting up your own business.

If you wanted to further your studies, we also have a number of postgraduate options.

Teaching methods

The BA (Hons) Criminal Justice and Criminology has been designed to build your skills, knowledge and confidence through a balance of core modules, which cover key skills and concepts in the field, and a selection of optional modules, which allow you to specialise in your own areas of interest. You will be taught using the innovative Hertfordshire Law School three-stage method:

  • Lectures on demand
    Our lectures can be downloaded to a laptop to watch at your leisure.
  • Develop your skills
    Our tutorials allow you to apply what you're taught in the based lectures and they are recorded and accessible on the University's intranet system.
  • Put what you've learnt into practice
    Our workshops provide small group sessions that reinforce learning and allow detailed exploration of the subject matter.

Structure

Year 1

Core Modules

  • Research, Ethics and Skills

    This module is designed to introduce students to the basic parameters of law, politics and international relations, and criminology. It is the foundation stone for successful undergraduate study within the School. The module provides a basis for understanding and conducting research, and will provide an introduction to various common and discipline-specific research methods and skills, along with more contemporary approaches such as the use of social media in research and emerging methodology. Various contexts in the legal, political and criminal justice fields will be utilised (such as ethics and morals in society, the creation of legislation and access to justice) to introduce these skills throughout the course of the module.

  • Crime and Law

    This module considers the general principles of criminal liability in England and Wales: actus reus; mens rea; denials of an offence, general defences; inchoate offences; parties to a crime; and some of the most serious criminal offences (such as murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person, sexual offences and property offences). It also examines the social and legal constructions of crime and how these have varied historically and in different social contexts. This course will demystify the law and help you to not only understand it but also enable you to make informed opinions about it. In addition, this module will outline the structure within which the criminal justice system operates and will also introduce key criminology concepts.

  • Criminal Justice Process

    This module focuses on the different stages of the criminal justice process and the agencies, both theoretically and in practice from a criminological viewpoint. The module offers an analysis of the process of criminal justice from the point of arrest to the outcome of court hearings mainly in Great Britain. The module also focuses on the agencies and institutions of the law, their roles, responsibilities and discretion as well as issues of accountability in relation to current developments in criminal justice.

  • Understanding Crime and Deviance

    Regardless of our own status as victims, offenders, practitioners or observers, issues of crime and theories about crime pervade our lives on a day-to-day level. Television, newspapers, the internet, conversations with friends, families and colleagues all play their part in constructing discourse about crime and deviance. Throughout our lives we develop differing levels of conformity and convention in relation to issues of crime and we develop various understandings and assumptions about how crime is the same or different from harms. This course provides an introduction to the study of crime and aims to develop the skills needed to study criminology effectively.

Optional

Year 2

Core Modules

  • Psychology of Criminal Behaviour

    Forensic and criminal psychology concerns the application of psychological theory and practice to the legal process and criminal behaviour. This can be a challenging yet fascinating subject for those studying criminology. This module will provide an extensive examination of how the psychology of offenders impacts their behaviour. The module will look at the history of criminality and examine different psychological and criminological theories by which criminal behaviour can be explained. Furthermore, the module will examine how psychology can be applied in the criminal justice system in what is known as forensic psychology. The module encourages critical thinking and explores the psychology of criminal justice institutions such as the police and prisons. Accordingly, instead of using psychology to look at the criminal per se, this module asks whether it is possible for the police, the courts and prisons to manufacture criminality.

  • Theories of Criminal Behaviour

    Specific theories about crime and criminal justice build upon broader social, political and philosophical ideas about power, knowledge, governance, subjectivity, state authority and justice. Yet these philosophical foundations are often neglected in criminological study, as attention tends to focus on narrower questions of why people commit crimes and how to best address the problem of crime. In order to engage critically with criminological questions, we need to develop an appreciation of the theoretical frameworks and conceptual building blocks that shape criminological knowledge itself.

Optional

  • Restorative Justice

    Restorative justice and alternative justice module motivates students to apply critical thinking to modern criminal justice systems. It traces the evolvement of the latest restorative justice movement. The module discusses the theoretical arguments made by restorative justice advocates, for example, the unjust exclusion of victims in traditional criminal justice, the limitations of state-owned judicial system and the ethical merits of ‘restorative communities’. It also examines the pilot projects that have put the ideas of restorative justice into practice. The combination of theoretical analysis and empirical evaluation is used to generate a comprehensive assessment and critique of the criminal justice reconfiguration in the late modern era.

  • Policing and Society

    This module will identify key issues and major debates surrounding policing policy and practice, in England and Wales. Offering a general overview of the history and organisational structure of the police; policing theory and practice; realism; policing and the media; core issues in policing society; public order policing and equal opportunities and the future of policing. The course aims to enable students to grapple with various social, legal and criminological dimensions of policing work. Integrating a range of subject-specific and transferable skills, the course aims to provide students with a solid methodological and theoretical basis from which to pursue their own independent learning in the specific field of policing studies, as well as within the criminology and criminal justice field more broadly.

  • Imprisonment and Justice

    This module will cover: Punishment through imprisonment arguably serves as the lynchpin of contemporary criminal justice systems. The threat of imprisonment underpins logics of deterrence, incapacitation and ‘just desserts’, as well as rehabilitative aims. Yet the success of imprisonment—both as a crime control measure and as an institution of rehabilitation—remains limited. So while the prison is a core feature of western liberal democracies, it is also a source of much controversy and debate. Particularly as prison populations in England, Wales and elsewhere continue to grow at unprecedented levels, and as technologies of punishment extend well beyond the physical boundaries of the prison walls, the stakes of these debates are high. The expansion of imprisonment also raises broader questions about the relationship between imprisonment, law, democracy, and justice.

  • Gender and Crime

    This module offers a thorough understanding of the connections between gender, crime and criminal justice. It studies the relationship between gender, victimisation and offending. It is highly recommended for students who are interested in considering gender in great depth and want to explore its connection with crime. Contemporary questions taking into account these elements are going to be discussed by this module. Gender crime is explored through reflecting on historical and contemporary theories on gender and crime, statistical information and political discourse. Do gender stereotypes affect women as victims and as offender? Are there and should there be different treatments in relation to the gender? How does the current criminal justice system regulate women offenders and victims and to which extent is gender taken into consideration? Feminist and criminological theories will assist the study of this module and the concept of gender will be considered alongside criminal justice, restorative justice, offending and victimisation.

  • Youth and Crime

    This module will cover: This module is aimed at evolving your understanding of the current issues concerning youth, crime and criminal justice. It regards the relationship between 'youth' and 'crime' and considers how ‘youth victimisation and youth culture’ are linked with ‘youth crime’. Theories associated with youth crime will be analysed and political discourse and statistical information will be also considered. The aim of the module is to develop your understanding of historical and modern debates and discourse with regard to youth justice, youth crime and their interrelationship with youth culture. Moreover, the module aims to focus on the role of restorative justice and alternative treatments against prison reform. For this reason, a global perspective is adopted.

  • Ethnicity and Crime

    This module will present a critical assessment of official information on the criminality of ethnic minorities. Although much of the debates will centre on the UK, the module will explore situations in other countries and jurisdictions. What is it about 'race' that has made it a variable in academic and political discussions about crime? What is the nature of the political response to the 'race and crime' debate? The module will critically examine the evidence on the criminalisation and victimisation of minority ethnic people, and how recent international and nation events have acerbated this; for example, in relation to the 'war' on terror. How effective has been the political efforts to tackle racism in the criminal justice system and address the problem of disproportionality? The module will offer a critical analysis of racism and the criminal justice process from crime and victimisation to policing, punishment and probation.

  • Criminal Evidence

    The Law of Evidence is arguably the most important subject one can study; what use is knowing the test for theft if it is unknown what facts can be relied upon to demonstrate the test has been satisfied? Evidence underpins all areas of substantive law. The module explores the various evidential tensions existing in criminal trials in England, notably balancing the need to ensure an accused receives a fair trial with the often conflicting needs of wider society and the general administration of justice. For example, why should evidence which suggests guilt be inadmissible? If a confession is true, is right that it can be excluded from consideration by the jury? Subjects include evidence relating to: • Confessions • Silence • Identification • Character • Hearsay As well as the theoretical perspectives, the module also puts the law into a practical context through the use of oral and written advocacy exercises.

Year 4

Core Modules

  • Dissertation

    The Dissertation module is an optional module of 30 Credit Points. It is a library based research of 10,000 words. This module provides you with the opportunity to choose a research topic that you are especially interested in and work on your own initiative. It allows you the freedom of independent study under the guidance of your supervisor, to undertake research on a specific legal topic, and to enhance your ability to master appropriate primary and secondary legal materials. This is your chance to develop a range of valuable skills different from those you have already gained from your undergraduate degree such as, researching, planning, writing well, thinking analytically, synthesizing complicated information, and organizing your time. It can also play an important role in showing a potential employer that you are able to work independently, plan a bigger project, collect information, and find the answer to any specific problem.

Optional

  • Internship

    The Internship requires students to undertake a period of work within a firm or organisation identified by the school and to reflect upon their experiences supported by appropriate research activities so as to underpin their professional development. Students are allocated a supervisor for their internship; these meetings will be documented by way of Diary sheets completed by both parties and will form the basis of the self-reflection journal which accounts for 70% of the overall mark. Student are required to give a presentation at the beginning of the module, which accounts for 30% of the overall mark.

  • Terrorism and Security

    Following the events of 11th September 2001, and 7th July 2005, public concerns surrounding terrorism, and its associated threats, have inevitably, perhaps irreversibly, deepened. Terrorism and security are, therefore, issues near at the top of the political agenda in countries from across the globe. This module will provide students with knowledge and understanding of the various approaches to studying terrorism and initiatives that are intended to counter it.

  • State Crime

    This module will cover: Long-standing debate within criminology about the scope and subject matter of state crime is reflected in the polarity of definitions of the concept, which locate breaches of the law by states at one end of the spectrum, and definitions based on non-statutory breaches of human rights at the other. How could the state be a criminal actor when legally it is the state itself that defines criminal behaviour by making and enforcing the law? Meaning, it could only be criminal on those rare occasions when it denounces itself for breaking its own laws. Yet, if criminology is to develop as a discipline that studies and analyses criminal, violent, abusive and deviant behaviours, then it is necessary to include state criminality in its field, on the grounds that the consequences of state crimes are more widespread and destructive than those of conventional crimes.

  • White Collar Crime and Corporate Crime

    This module will equip students with an appreciation of the political, social and financial costs of white-collar crime, as well as the particular challenges that exist in its effective detection, measurement and interdiction. It will enable students to recognise and engage with the political, social and economic considerations that shape policies towards white-collar and corporate crime. The module will be wide-ranging and research-led providing a rounded introduction to key literature and debates in the field from an international comparative perspective.

  • Criminal Profiling

    Criminal profiling focuses on the application of psychology in criminal investigation and law enforcement. This module discusses the ground theories of criminal profiling, for example, the Modus operandi (M.O.) of offenders and the ‘signature crime’. It also examines the two different models of profiling, i.e. the FBI profiling and the DNA profiling. The former is based on the behavioural characteristics of an offender. Criminal profiling under this model depends on the analysis of crime scenes, victims’ circumstances, autopsy reports and witnesses’ statements. The latter, in contrast, relies on modern biological technology. This module will compare and critically evaluate the two models of criminal profiling and their applications in practice. It pays particular attention to the use of criminal profiling in Great Britain and the criticism on it.

  • Forensic Evidence

    Forensic evidence is a multidisciplinary area in criminology and criminal justice. This module introduces the widely-applied biological and chemical techniques in criminal investigation, for example, blood analysis, DNA testing and drug identification. It also examines how the evidence generated by modern technology is introduced to the courtroom. This module will discuss in depth the admissibility rules for forensic evidence. It will also examine the procedural problems concerning expert witnesses. This course will demystify how forensic evidence is used to reconstruct crime scenes at the investigation stage and how it is deployed to build a criminal case at the trial stage.

  • Human Rights

    This module will cover: The module examines the basis for the Human Rights discourse moving from the particular UK legal situation to the wider aspects of the European Convention, focusing on and establishing threads of similarities in order to establish a cohesive picture of Human Rights. The module focuses initially on the Human Rights Act 1998 and the effects on human rights in the UK since the Act came into force in 2000. This is followed by consideration of the European Convention on Human Rights machinery and its relationship with the UK’s domestic legal order. The module explores the extent to which key European human rights concepts and principles are apt in maintaining a healthy relationship between the UK and the ECHR institutions. It pays particular attention to a number of fundamental rights and their interplay including the prohibition of torture, the right to life, aspects of fair trial, the right to private life, religious freedom, and freedom of expression.

  • Jurisprudence

    The module will consider the relationship between law, morality and political theory along with the nature of moral arguments and cultural influences on law and the influence of political arguments in judicial interpretation and its impact on legal theory.

  • Jurisprudence

    The module will consider the relationship between law, morality and political theory along with the nature of moral arguments and cultural influences on law and the influence of political arguments in judicial interpretation and its impact on legal theory. The historical development of natural law and its continued legal relevance and contemporary theories of legal positivism, along with American Legal Realism and its contribution to theories of adjudication and Dworkin and his contribution to a theory of rights and political liberalism will also be explored. The module will also examine Legal and political obligation, the nature of justice: Aristotle, John Rawls and Robert Nozick, Law and Morality: medical law issues as examples and punishment and its justifications.

  • Transnational and Organised Crime

  • Surveillance State

    It is easy to be cynical about governmental surveillance. In recent years, a parade of disclosures relating to state-endorsed population monitoring initiatives have generated claims that we are entering an era of pervasive government surveillance akin to that envisaged by George Orwell in his famous work 1984. The extent to which such assertions are accurate, however, is a matter of contention. This module explores how governments not only facilitate surveillance, but also act to constrain it. It will include a heavy focus on the growth of the nation state, early forms of surveillance, and how these have been challenged, refined, and adapted over time, before then examining the key political, social and cultural consequences that stem from their use. The aim of the module will be to encourage students to consider the ethics and politics of openness, secrecy, and deception in the field of government surveillance, with the ultimate objective of developing a rigorous critical perspective of the area. Particular subjects to be considered include: data retention, the monitoring of electronic communications networks, the interception of communications, biometrics and CCTV, data mining and profiling, aerial surveillance, and the use of RFID and other geo-location services.

  • Regulation, Governance and Policy

    Regulation has become a permanent fixture in the governance of contemporary democratic societies. In the present day there are, for instance, very few spheres of activity, of either economic or social character, that are not subject to regulatory control or oversight in some form. This module is intended to introduce students to the concept of regulation, the forms it can take, its underlying theories and rationale, and a range of policy areas where questions pertaining to regulation are particularly salient (such as technology, banking, energy, healthcare, the media and crime) with a view to examining when, if ever, it is desirable for the state to prohibit, restrict, or otherwise exert influence over certain activities or behaviours. The module will be particularly useful to those interested in the formation of public policy and regulation generally, but also to those who take an interest in the regulation of particular sectors. It will encourage students to draw upon insights from various social scientific perspectives (including politics, law, economics and criminology) in order to understand how regulation can be leveraged to help to shape public policy outcomes and social behaviour.

  • Cybercrime and Cybersecurity

    The module will enable students to understand the development of cybercrime as a phenomenon, both domestically and internationally. Students will be able to appreciate the Internet architecture and landscape within which the novel types of crimes arise. The module will look at the existing and emerging types of crime online, inter alia: computer misuse and hacking, Cyber fraud, Online harassment and trolling, Online pornography and child pornography, Online piracy and Cyberwarfare. This list is, however, not exhaustive as the module will inevitably include and examine the emerging cybercrimes and regulation that aims to prevent and tackle these criminal behaviours.

  • Drugs, Crime and Criminal Justice

  • Human Rights

    The module examines the basis for the Human Rights discourse moving from the particular UK legal situation to the wider aspects of the European Convention, focusing on and establishing threads of similarities in order to establish a cohesive picture of Human Rights. The module focuses initially on the Human Rights Act 1998 and the effects on human rights in the UK since the Act came into force in 2000. This is followed by consideration of the European Convention on Human Rights machinery and its relationship with the UK’s domestic legal order. The module explores the extent to which key European human rights concepts and principles are apt in maintaining a healthy relationship between the UK and the ECHR institutions. It pays particular attention to a number of fundamental rights and their interplay including the prohibition of torture, the right to life, aspects of fair trial, the right to private life, religious freedom, and freedom of expression.

Fees & funding

The government has yet to announce the upper limit of Tuition Fees for applicants wishing to study an undergraduate course in 2018/19. As soon as this information becomes available, our website will be updated and we will contact everyone who has applied to the University to advise them of their Tuition Fee.

Fees 2017

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1155 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,350 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1420 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

View detailed information about tuition fees

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
25/09/201731/05/2018Apply online (Part Time)
22/01/201831/07/2018Apply online (Part Time)
25/09/201731/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
22/01/201831/07/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
25/09/201731/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2018

Start DateEnd DateLink
24/09/201831/05/2019Apply online (Full Time)
25/09/201831/05/2019Apply online (Part Time)
22/01/201931/07/2019Apply online (Part Time)
25/09/201831/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
22/01/201931/07/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
25/09/201831/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2019

Start DateEnd DateLink
24/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time)
25/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Part Time)
22/01/202031/07/2020Apply online (Part Time)
25/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
22/01/202031/07/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
25/09/201931/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)