11 February 2015

'A Visual History of the Future' authors Professor Nick Dunn and Serena Pollastri (Lancaster University) and Dr Paul Cureton (Design Research Group / Digital Hack Lab, School of Creative Arts, University of Hertfordshire) reviewed nearly a thousand examples of proposed cities of the future. They selected around 100 projects, proposals and fictional cities that they felt were emblematic of the shifting paradigms of the last century of urbanism.

At the Royal Institute of British Architects, London.

A new exhibition charting a visual history of the future as the basis to explore the UK's key urban challenges. 

February 10th 2015 to March 31st 2015

Imagining the city of the future has long been a source of fascination for architects, artists, and designers. Through drawings, maps and film, urban futures have been depicted in many ways — from tranquil green utopia's and great domed constructions to vast, inter connected mega-structures and machines.

A Visual History of the Future authors Professor Nick Dunn and Serena Pollastri (Lancaster University) and Dr Paul Cureton (Design Research Group / Digital Hack Lab, School of Creative Arts, University of Hertfordshire) reviewed nearly a thousand examples of proposed cities of the future, selecting around 100 projects, proposals and fictional cities that they felt were emblematic of the shifting paradigms of the last century of urbanism. By grouping them into categories – the "regulated" city, the "layered" city, the "flexible" city, and so on – the authors argue we can better understand how the dominant future urban visions of today may shape our cities in decades to come.,

The event was a new exhibition at the Royal Institute of British Architects, drawing on the work of the Foresight Future of Cities Project, Government Office of Science and the RIBA, co curated by Professor Nick Dunn, Nick Francis & Dr Paul Cureton.

Drawing on the work of the Foresight Future of Cities Project and the RIBA, this exhibition explores a visual history of the future to outline the UK's key urban challenges over the coming decades. What do changing technologies, demographics and lifestyles mean for our cities? How can emerging tools help future proof cities and their citizens? What might your city look like in 2065?

Take a look at event information or to read the report.

We also featured in the Guardian on 'Where are our flying cars and hoverboards'