Exploring potential

Research

The University is developing techniques and technologies that will assist our society, protect our environment and power the future economy.

We will carry out research that transforms lives, addressing fundamental global and societal challenges by:

  • Offering research opportunities for staff and students
  • Engaging the community in impactful research
  • Adapting flexibly to research partnerships.

Objectives

  • Develop a diverse community of research engaged staff, students and innovators
  • Deliver teaching enriched by research
  • Develop a multi-disciplinary whole community research-rich culture that fosters intellectual curiosity
  • Develop sustainable global partnerships that address societal and industrial priorities and grow our global research profile
  • Encourage research outcomes that are impactful, accessible and widely communicated
  • Champion a community of learning, thought and knowledge

Ground-breaking research addressing some of today’s biggest challenges

Our ground-breaking research is addressing some of today’s biggest challenges regionally, nationally and globally. Much of our collaborative, interdisciplinary research aims to tackle the four Grand Challenges identified in the Government’s Industrial Strategy, relating to artificial intelligence, clean growth, smart mobility and our ageing society.

The University has long been associated with the technologies that make up the ‘fourth industrial revolution’, with Hatfield Technical College being instrumental in developing the country’s cutting-edge engineering industry, in the hometown of the Comet, the world’s first commercial jetliner.

Today, the University is developing technologies that will help both protect our environment while powering our future economy. Technologies developed in our Microfluids and Microengineering Research Group are being applied to food security challenges, including improving the selection and timing of fungicides. The University of Hertfordshire is one of two Universities in the VALUMICS consortium, a major new Europe-wide research project looking at the resilience and sustainability of the food journey from farmer to consumer. And the University’s £1.5million bespoke lidar system (3D laser radar) in the School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics is enhancing our understanding of atmospheric pollution. The lidar system fires laser light into the troposphere, enabling researchers to analyse pollutants and provide ground-breaking insights into how the distribution and make-up of these pollutants contribute to climate change, air quality and crop yields.

Our ground-breaking research is addressing some of today’s biggest challenges regionally, nationally and globally. Much of our collaborative, interdisciplinary research aims to tackle the four Grand Challenges identified in the Government’s Industrial Strategy, relating to artificial intelligence, clean growth, smart mobility and our ageing society.

In the area of health and wellbeing, our multidisciplinary research address some of the most important societal challenges of our ageing population. Following a three-year study into the provision of better healthcare in care homes, the findings have been widely cited in the continuing debate over how the NHS can best provide healthcare to people living in care homes. The University is now leading a new four-year study, funded by the National Institute of Health Research, which will address the need to develop robust systems that support how all the different social care and public health services and individuals work together for residents’ benefit.

In the field of AI, our Smart Systems Lab is applying cross-disciplinary research to create technologies for automation in our homes that will change the way we live. Our pioneering work in robotics, particularly in companion and rehabilitation technology has been recognised through the inclusion of four research projects on the European Commission’s Innovation Radar. This newly launched public platform aims to get innovations and to market more quickly by bringing technological and scientific advances to the attention of entrepreneurs, funding agencies and investors. Expertise that the University is expanding into the commercial sector include TAME, a third-generation threat assessment methodology which can be used by businesses to help them assess how much cyber security they need and where controls should be applied. It is hoped the University-supported start-up will result in a spin-out company that can commercially develop as part of the UK cybersecurity ecosystem.