BSc (Hons) Computing and Mathematics with Optional Sandwich Placement/ Study Abroad

About the course

1/

Mathematics

This course will enable you to develop a solid understanding of the fundamentals of mathematics. In addition, it will develop your understanding of applications of mathematics that provide support to studies in business, computing, economics, engineering and the sciences. In your first year you will refresh and build upon your understanding of topics covered at A level.

In your second year these topics will be extended and explored further. If you are studying the Joint study route (50% mathematics) you will also develop additional skills and those on the major study route (75% mathematics) will explore computer techniques.

Your final year will focus on applying the knowledge and skills you’ve gained to practical problems drawn from a wide variety of areas.

Computing

Computing will provide you with an understanding of theoretical foundations, as well as building your knowledge as a designer and developer. You will complete practical work in well-equipped and spacious laboratories and our strong links with commerce ensure you are always working from the most up-to-date study materials.

You don’t need any previous knowledge of computing for this course, your first year will provide you with a solid foundation in the basic principles of the subject. In your second and final years you’ll have an opportunity to tailor your learning to your personal interests by selecting modules from one of three themes:

  • development of information systems
  • programme design
  • internal organisation of systems and networks

Why choose this course?

Mathematics

  • Study mathematics in a department with a long tradition of high quality teaching
  • Improve your understanding of advanced mathematical concepts taught in an approachable format
  • Gain a relevant degree that provides transferable skills that are highly valued by employers

Computing

  • Study computing in some of the best facilities offered by any university in the UK.
  • Benefit from excellent industry contacts and gain knowledge and skills valued within the industry
  • Gain a practical understanding of a range of computing systems providing excellent preparation for a career in a range of roles

Entry requirements...

2017 entry 

UCAS are introducing a new tariff for 2017 entry so the points being asked for are substantially different to previous years.

112 UCAS points including A level Maths.

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above.

GCSE Maths and English Language at Grade 4 or above (Grade C or above under the old grading structure).

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band.

If you do not have the required IELTS or equivalent for direct entry on to your degree programme, our Pre-sessional English and International Foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

For country specific qualifications, please visit our Your Country page.

Careers

This programme gives you flexibility in your studies at university resulting in flexibility in your choice of career at the end of your course. You will acquire a much broader base of knowledge and experience that could really widen your employment opportunities. Graduates have found employment in diverse roles such as computer programmers, design engineers, management development specialists, accountants and project managers. 95.2% of University of Hertfordshire students are in work or further study six months after graduating, according to the latest Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

Teaching methods

You will develop your capacity for independent study and interpersonal skills on this programme. There is an emphasis on structured research, well-prepared written and verbal presentations and computer literacy.

You will experience a wide variety of teaching styles on the programme including:

  • standard lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • laboratories
  • case studies
  • individual and group projects

In your final year you will normally have the opportunity to hone your independent study and interpersonal skills by undertaking a major project or dissertation.

Work Placement

You will have the opportunity to take a paid work placement or study abroad for a year between your second and final years, extending your degree from a three year to a four year qualification. You will not be required to pay tuition fees for this year and you will gain excellent experience that sets you apart from the crowd in the graduate jobs market.

A work placement provides you with an excellent opportunity to gain valuable experience and put your theoretical knowledge and understanding from your studies in to practice.

Our Careers and Placements service will help you to develop your CV and support you through the application process for a wide range of placement opportunities in a variety of sectors and organisations.

Study Abroad

This course offers you the opportunity to study abroad in the Sandwich Year through the University's study abroad programme. Study abroad opportunities are available worldwide and in Europe under the Erasmus+ Programme.
Find out more about Study abroad opportunities

Structure

Level 4

Core Modules

  • Human Dimensions of Computing (A)

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces the history and major accomplishments of computer science and information technology, and its impact on modern life. Technology is only one part of computer science and information technology, and the human and social dimension of computing, including user experience and interaction design, is just as important and relevant to the professional practitioner.

  • Programming (A)

    Credits: 15

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in high level languages. The emphasis is on problem solving, problem solving strategies; fundamental constructs such as structure, syntax and semantics; variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures, and modularisation, data structures and recursion. Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will initially be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems.

  • Programming (B)

    Credits: 15

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in high level languages. The emphasis is on problem solving, problem solving strategies; fundamental constructs such as structure, syntax and semantics; variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures, and modularisation, data structures and recursion. Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will initially be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems.

  • Models and Methods in Computing (B)

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces a number of principles that underlie computation and computer-based systems, and how they may be modelled. Both the static and dynamic aspects of computing systems are considered, with computation being viewed both in functional terms, and as a series of state transitions defined over abstract or virtual machines. The module provides a clear concept of modelling and specification of computational systems. The module illustrates some of the ways in which the use of formalisms in modelling and specification can aid those involved in the design, development and operation of computer-based systems.

  • Small Group Tutorial

    Credits: 0

    The module will require students to attempt a range of problems, mostly of a mathematical nature, broadly in the students' subject area. Some problems will be associated with other specific taught modules on the programme, while others will have a synoptic role sitting across several modules. The work will challenge students to develop problem solving skills that enable them to approach unfamiliar as well as familiar problems.

  • Mathematical Techniques 1

    Credits: 30

    On entry students will have different mathematical knowledge and this module has been designed to standardise their mathematical knowledge. The module will initially review core areas of A-Level Mathematics which will be extended to improve students' knowledge. You will learn the standard mathematical techniques in calculus, matrices, vectors and series.

  • Linear Algebra

    Credits: 15

    Linear algebra is a fundamental area of mathematics and is arguably the most powerful mathematical tool ever developed. It is a core topic of study with fields as diverse as business, economics, engineering, science etc. For an example of linear algebra at work, one need look no further than the Google search engine, which relies on linear algebra to rank the results of a search with respect to relevance.

  • Numbers and Sets

    Credits: 15

    This module aims to present the really fundamental ideas and language on which the rest of mathematics is based. This will give you a much better understanding of some of the ideas you may have met previously, such as how mathematicians view sets, functions, different types of numbers. The course also investigates the concept of sequences and the idea of tending to a limit, on which calculus is based.

Optional

Level 5

Core Modules

  • Information Technology Development Exercise

    Credits: 30

    The core of the module is a realistic case study, undertaken in small teams, to develop a software system. Developing such a system is not just a matter of understanding the basics of software engineering and project management, but also requires skills acquired through hands-on practice. This approach of learning through experience involves the challenge of identifying, comprehending and critically handling a number of advanced methodologies, concepts, techniques and technologies. A further key element of the module is professionalism and the relevance of the academic content to professional practice in the IT industry. The module provides: Experience of working in a team on a complete systems development project; Knowledge of and skills in modern software engineering techniques; An appreciation of the relevance to the IT workplace, in part acquired through business case studies; The background and attitude for seeking professional employment in the IT industry, especially in software development.

  • Web Scripting

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces the fundamental concepts of the World Wide Web. It starts with an overview of HTML mark-up and cascading style sheets, and the importance of the separation between content and presentation. The bulk of this module is concerned with extending the practical programming skills, and applying these to the development of a web application that creates, reads, updates and deletes information using databases. Further, an important part of this module is understanding the constraints that the World Wide Web places on developers, such as those imposed by its stateless nature and the various recommendations that guide core web technologies.

  • Enterprise Databases

    Credits: 15

    This module provides an in-depth study of the design and implementation of relational databases. The module provides the principles and the techniques needed to develop relational database systems, together with the database theory on which these principles and techniques are founded. There is a large practical element, using a popular market leading product in the roles of database designer, database administrator and end user. The module also raises awareness of areas where new types of database are emerging.

  • Graduate & Employability Skills

    Credits: 0

    You will be offered a variety of employment enhancing workshops and online activities such as interview skills workshops, personality profiling and career planning in order to improve your employment prospects after graduation and make you aware of current areas of strength and weakness in relation to employability. You will also have the opportunity to learn about self-employment options, graduate schemes and will attend speaker sessions with successful professionals in areas of employment appropriate for Joint Honours graduates so you can learn about the skills and attributes required for these areas and how to enhance your prospects of entering such areas. You will be required to undertake a certain number of activities chosen by you from a career “menu” and to reflect on what they have learnt in order to complete the module successfully.

  • Mathematical Techniques 2

    Credits: 15

    You will learn how to integrate functions of two and three variables along plane and space curves and how to evaluate multiple integrals of such functions. You will learn about gradient, divergence and curl. You will be able to obtain the Fourier transform of a function and perform calculations involving analytic functions of a complex variable.

  • Number Theory

    Credits: 15

    Number theory is one of the oldest branches of mathematics and is concerned with the properties of integers. Number theory has many practical applications including such topics as cryptography. This module will look at divisibility among integers, the Euclidean algorithm and factorization into prime numbers. The distribution of the primes will be investigated. Modular ("clock") arithmetic leads to the investigation of congruences, Fermat's little theorem, Chinese remainder theorem, and quadratic reciprocity. We also consider Euler's phi function, and other topics such as Diophantine equations and continued fractions.

  • Real Analysis

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces Real Analysis, one of the core topics in pure mathematics. We deal mainly with real-valued functions of a single real variable, and the central concept we introduce is the precise definition of what it means for such a function to be continuous. This definition is beautiful and yet notoriously subtle. In building up to it, we review and extend concepts from Level 4 about the meaning of convergence of sequences of real numbers, and we isolate the key property which distinguishes the real numbers from other number systems: that of completeness. We go on to give a similarly precise treatment of differentiability of functions. In the concluding section of the course, we look at power-series expansions of functions and discuss theorems about their convergence properties.

  • Differential Equations

    Credits: 15

    This module employs a variety of mathematical methods and techniques to explore, describe and predict the behaviour of scientific, industrial and engineering phenomena. The subject appeals to individuals interested in applying mathematics to real-word problems. In this module, we focus on ordinary differential equations. The emphasis is on the development of methods important in applications. Topics include:- Theory and applications of first, second and higher order differential equations. The Laplace transforms method. Systems of linear differential equations and power series solutions to differential equations.

Optional

Level 6

Core Modules

  • User Experience

    Credits: 15

    This module explores the body of knowledge underpinning the topic of User Experience (UX), and how UX approaches can be applied to the design and evaluation of user interfaces.

  • Information Security Management

    Credits: 15

    This module develops the concepts and principles of information security management including its organisational aspects such as security governance, policy procedures and security standards. It covers the relevant methods associated with risk assessment and management. In this module, various issues associated with information assurance, incident management and government legislation on data protection will be presented. This module introduces security controls that are used to protect information and underlying IT systems and infrastructure. Disaster recovery, business continuity management, investigation and digital forensics which are important aspects of information security management will be discussed in this module.

  • Advanced Web Scripting

    Credits: 15

    This module extends the basic web model in two ways. The first looks at the use of client-side scripting to enhance the user experience. This is done by examining the use of Javascript to increase the interactivity of the user view, and to exploit local data storage. The second is to consider the use of services to move beyond a simple HTML page request/response model of interaction. In addition, the module considers the impact of third party tools in developing web applications. For enhancing the user experience this may include interface toolkits such as JQuery. Service-based extensions may include the use of functional libraries such as the Google Maps API.

  • Graduate & Employability Skills

    Credits: 0

    You will be able to access employability and enterprise resources including workshops, online materials and books in order to help you formulate a career or post-graduate study plan. You will have the opportunity to hear speakers from a variety of areas give advice and guidance as to how to enter those fields. You will be required to undertake a certain number of activities chosen by you from a career “menu” and to reflect on what they have learnt in order to complete the module successfully.

  • Complex Analysis

    Credits: 15

    Complex Numbers are two dimensional, and are an unordered set. This leads to many startling and bizarre ideas. We apply the ideas of continuity and differentiability to functions of a complex variable, and reach some surprising conclusions. However, it is when applying the ideas of integration that the most beautiful and impressive results emerge, with many practical applications.

  • Linear Optimisation

    Credits: 15

    You learn to extract the relevant information from business problems and to develop linear programming models to represent them. A number of different solution methods are developed and used to solve these problems. You will develop the ability to interpret the solutions in practical terms and deal with the problem cases that sometimes arise when solving LP problems.

  • Combinatorics

    Credits: 15

    Combinatorics is the study of finite or countable, discrete structures; as opposed to uncountable, continuous structures such as the real or complex numbers studied in Analysis and Calculus. Graphs (think of a system of islands connected by bridges) and Latin Squares (a completed Sudoku puzzle is an example of a Latin Square) are two examples of the kind of object Combinatorists are particularly interested in, but there are many more. Combinatorial problems are just as varied as Combinatorial objects and include questions such as “How many different number plates can there be?”, “If you shuffle a playlist, what are the odds that at least one song is in its original position”, or “Can you find six people so that no three of them are all mutual friends, but no three of them are all mutual strangers?”.

  • Nonlinear Systems

    Credits: 15

    You will learn how to investigate and evaluate the qualitative behaviour of the solutions of differential equations which relate to problems in a wide variety of application areas. You will recognise that the behaviour of the solution of a differential equation can be drastically altered by a small change in a parameter. These observations have important contributions in improving the applications of mathematics in industry, business and the physical sciences. The module provides the student with an understanding of differential equations by the construction, analyse and interpretation of phase portraits. In particular you will be able to identify if and when periodic solutions and other types of behaviour exist.

Optional

  • Professional Work Placement in Computer Science

    Credits: 0

    Supervised work experience provides students with the opportunity to set their academic studies in a broader context, to gain practical experience in specific technical areas and to strengthen their communication and time-management skills. It greatly assists them in developing as independent learners, so that they will be able to gain maximum benefit from the learning opportunities afforded by their future study programme. It gives them opportunities, according to the nature of the placement experience, to acquire the basis of technical expertise in specialist areas, which they may be able to enhance through study after completion of the placement, especially in the final project.

  • Software Quality

    Credits: 15

    This module provides both a theoretical and practical introduction to quality both in terms of the software development process and the products of that process. It also investigates how quality can be defined and measured, and by analysing actual program code to determine its quality according to pre-determined quality metrics.

  • Enterprise Systems

    Credits: 15

    This module explores different perspectives on the design, management and integration of software systems that support business processes across complex organisations. The first perspective examines the integration and inter-operation of different applications within the same enterprise. The focus is on appropriate approaches and methods for bridging the gap between IT strategy, which aligns business goals and system requirements, and the design and management of individual IT services. This could include, but is not limited to, approaches based on ITIL and/or SOA. The second perspective examines the scalability of systems that provide specific functionality across the whole of an enterprise. This is done by breaking down an application into different tiers and looking at the issues, potential problems and design solutions to enable the delivery of high performance systems. This focus on individual systems is a natural extension to study of design patterns for web applications.

  • Year Abroad

    Credits: 0

    Learning and teaching methods may include taught courses, a research programme, or a mixture of these. components. The Year Abroad will be for TWO academic semesters or their equivalent. The student will follow a programme negotiated by the Study Abroad team or nominee, School Study Abroad Tutor and an equivalent representative of the host institution. Prior to the commencement of the Year Abroad, the student, the appropriate officers from UH and from the host institution will agree a learning contract and mode of attendance. In institutions where the language of instruction is not English, then the learning contract will take into account the students ability in the language of instruction of the host institution. The student will be required to provide evidence of appropriate attainment and ability in the language of instruction of the chosen institution when the language of instruction is not English.

  • Professional Placement

    Credits: 0

    Supervised work experience provides students with the opportunity to set their academic studies in a broader context, to gain practical experience in specific technical areas and to strengthen their communication and time-management skills. It greatly assists them in developing as independent learners, so that they are able to gain the maximum benefit from the learning opportunities provided at level 6 of the programme.

  • Year Abroad

    Credits: 0

    The Year Abroad will provide students with the opportunity to expand, develop and apply the knowledge and skills gained in the first two taught years of the degree within a different organisational and cultural environment in a partner academic institution. The host institution will appoint a Programme Co-ordinator who will oversee the student's programme during the Year Abroad and will liaise with the appointed UH Supervisor.

Fees & funding

The government has yet to announce the upper limit of Tuition Fees for applicants wishing to study an undergraduate course in 2018/19. As soon as this information becomes available, our website will be updated and we will contact everyone who has applied to the University to advise them of their Tuition Fee.

Fees 2017

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1155 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,850 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1485 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

Fees 2018

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1155 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,950 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1500 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

View detailed information about tuition fees

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2018

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2019

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)