BSc (Hons) Computing and Law with Optional Sandwich Placement/ Study Abroad

About the course

1/

Law

Develop relevant practical skills to prepare you for a wide range of careers. Our law modules are taught through a participative and interactive environment. You will develop:

  • Interpersonal and group skills 
  • An ability to solve problems 
  • Logical argument and reasoning skills 
  • Your interpretation of the written word 
  • An understanding of social values and public affairs. 

Whether you are interested in becoming a legal practitioner or simply interested in the law in a more general context, you will develop a core set of skills that will develop your employability and provide valuable insights. 

Computing

Computing will provide you with an understanding of theoretical foundations, as well as building your knowledge as a designer and developer. You will complete practical work in well-equipped and spacious laboratories and our strong links with commerce ensure you are always working from the most up-to-date study materials.

You don’t need any previous knowledge of computing for this course, your first year will provide you with a solid foundation in the basic principles of the subject. In your second and final years you’ll have an opportunity to tailor your learning to your personal interests by selecting modules from one of three themes:

  •  development of information systems
  •  programme design
  • internal organisation of systems and networks

Why choose this course?

Law

  • Study at one of the top five post-1992 university law schools in the UK
  • Equip yourself for a broad range of careers in the law industry, commerce and the public sector
  • Gain experience through mooting and debating competitions as well as visits to courts and tribunals

Computing

  • Study computing in some of the best facilities offered by any university in the UK
  • Benefit from excellent industry contacts and gain knowledge and skills valued within the industry
  • Gain a practical understanding of a range of computing systems providing excellent preparation for a career in a range of roles

Entry requirements...

2017 entry 

UCAS are introducing a new tariff for 2017 entry so the points being asked for are substantially different to previous years.

112 UCAS points 

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above.

GCSE Maths and English Language at Grade 4 or above (Grade C or above under the old grading structure).

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band.

If you do not have the required IELTS or equivalent for direct entry on to your degree programme, our Pre-sessional English and International Foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

For country specific qualifications, please visit our Your Country page.

Careers

This programme gives you flexibility in your studies at university resulting in flexibility in your choice of career at the end of your course. You will acquire a much broader base of knowledge and experience that could really widen your employment opportunities. Graduates have found employment in diverse roles such as computer programmers, design engineers, management development specialists, accountants and project managers. 95.2% of University of Hertfordshire students are in work or further study six months after graduating, according to the latest Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey.

Teaching methods

You will develop your capacity for independent study and interpersonal skills on this programme. There is an emphasis on structured research, well-prepared written and verbal presentations and computer literacy.

You will experience a wide variety of teaching styles on the programme including:

  • standard lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • laboratories
  • case studies
  • individual and group projects

In your final year you will normally have the opportunity to hone your independent study and interpersonal skills by undertaking a major project or dissertation.

Work Placement

You will have the opportunity to take a paid work placement or study abroad for a year between your second and final years, extending your degree from a three year to a four year qualification. You will not be required to pay tuition fees for this year and you will gain excellent experience that sets you apart from the crowd in the graduate jobs market.

A work placement provides you with an excellent opportunity to gain valuable experience and put your theoretical knowledge and understanding from your studies in to practice.

Our Careers and Placements service will help you to develop your CV and support you through the application process for a wide range of placement opportunities in a variety of sectors and organisations.

Study Abroad

This course offers you the opportunity to study abroad in the Sandwich Year through the University's study abroad programme. Study abroad opportunities are available worldwide and in Europe under the Erasmus+ Programme.
Find out more about Study abroad opportunities

Structure

Level 4

Core Modules

  • Human Dimensions of Computing (A)

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces the history and major accomplishments of computer science and information technology, and its impact on modern life. Technology is only one part of computer science and information technology, and the human and social dimension of computing, including user experience and interaction design, is just as important and relevant to the professional practitioner.

  • Programming (A)

    Credits: 15

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in high level languages. The emphasis is on problem solving, problem solving strategies; fundamental constructs such as structure, syntax and semantics; variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures, and modularisation, data structures and recursion. Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will initially be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems.

  • Programming (B)

    Credits: 15

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in high level languages. The emphasis is on problem solving, problem solving strategies; fundamental constructs such as structure, syntax and semantics; variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures, and modularisation, data structures and recursion. Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will initially be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems.

  • Models and Methods in Computing (B)

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces a number of principles that underlie computation and computer-based systems, and how they may be modelled. Both the static and dynamic aspects of computing systems are considered, with computation being viewed both in functional terms, and as a series of state transitions defined over abstract or virtual machines. The module provides a clear concept of modelling and specification of computational systems. The module illustrates some of the ways in which the use of formalisms in modelling and specification can aid those involved in the design, development and operation of computer-based systems.

  • Research, Ethics and Skills

    Credits: 30

    This module is designed to introduce students to the basic parameters of law and criminology. It is the foundation stone for successful undergraduate study within these programmes. The module provides a basis for understanding and conducting research, and will provide an introduction to various common and discipline-specific research methods and skills, along with more contemporary approaches such as the use of social media in research and emerging methodology. Various contexts in the legal and criminological fields will be utilised (such as ethics and morals in society, the creation of legislation and access to justice) to introduce these skills throughout the course of the module.

  • Contract Law

    Credits: 30

    This module will cover a variety of themes commencing with formation of a contract, including offer, acceptance, consideration and privity of contract. The contents of the contract will also be explored and will include examination of conditions, warranties, express and implied terms, standard form contracts, exclusion clauses. Students will also be introduced to various vitiating factors such as misrepresentation, mistake, undue influence, duress, unconscionable bargains and inequality of bargaining power. The module will end by exploring how a contract could end and include performance, agreement, frustration, breach. In the context of a breach of contract a variety of contractual remedies will be explored (including damages, specific performance, rescission and injunctions) along with an outline of the law of restitution.

Optional

Level 5

Core Modules

  • Information Technology Development Exercise

    Credits: 30

    The core of the module is a realistic case study, undertaken in small teams, to develop a software system. Developing such a system is not just a matter of understanding the basics of software engineering and project management, but also requires skills acquired through hands-on practice. This approach of learning through experience involves the challenge of identifying, comprehending and critically handling a number of advanced methodologies, concepts, techniques and technologies. A further key element of the module is professionalism and the relevance of the academic content to professional practice in the IT industry. The module provides: Experience of working in a team on a complete systems development project; Knowledge of and skills in modern software engineering techniques; An appreciation of the relevance to the IT workplace, in part acquired through business case studies; The background and attitude for seeking professional employment in the IT industry, especially in software development.

  • Web Scripting

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces the fundamental concepts of the World Wide Web. It starts with an overview of HTML mark-up and cascading style sheets, and the importance of the separation between content and presentation. The bulk of this module is concerned with extending the practical programming skills, and applying these to the development of a web application that creates, reads, updates and deletes information using databases. Further, an important part of this module is understanding the constraints that the World Wide Web places on developers, such as those imposed by its stateless nature and the various recommendations that guide core web technologies.

  • Enterprise Databases

    Credits: 15

    This module provides an in-depth study of the design and implementation of relational databases. The module provides the principles and the techniques needed to develop relational database systems, together with the database theory on which these principles and techniques are founded. There is a large practical element, using a popular market leading product in the roles of database designer, database administrator and end user. The module also raises awareness of areas where new types of database are emerging.

  • Graduate & Employability Skills

    Credits: 0

    You will be offered a variety of employment enhancing workshops and online activities such as interview skills workshops, personality profiling and career planning in order to improve your employment prospects after graduation and make you aware of current areas of strength and weakness in relation to employability. You will also have the opportunity to learn about self-employment options, graduate schemes and will attend speaker sessions with successful professionals in areas of employment appropriate for Joint Honours graduates so you can learn about the skills and attributes required for these areas and how to enhance your prospects of entering such areas. You will be required to undertake a certain number of activities chosen by you from a career “menu” and to reflect on what they have learnt in order to complete the module successfully.

Optional

  • European Union Law

    Credits: 30

    The course starts by examining the EU institutions and how a member state like the UK participates in the formation and implementation of EU law. It then considers the substantive rules governing the internal market. This is the geographical area comprising the member states within which goods and workers can circulate freely without being impeded by unjustifiable obstacles in the same way as they would do so within a nation state. The rich case law considered illustrates the determination of the Court of Justice to secure free movement against the various ways employed by the Members States to protect their domestic goods against foreign competition and to restrict free movement more generally. Students are introduced to the special role played by the Court of Justice in developing European Law though the preliminary ruling procedure and enforcement procedures. The system of EU remedies delivered by national courts is also examined so as to evaluate the effectiveness of EU Law.

  • Criminal Law

    Credits: 30

    This module considers the general principles of criminal liability in Great Britain: actus reus; mens rea; denials of an offence, general defences; inchoate offences; parties to a crime; and some of the most serious criminal offences (such as murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person, sexual offences and property offences). It also examines the social and legal constructions of crime and how these have varied historically and in different social contexts. This course will demystify the law and help you to not only understand it but also enable you to make informed opinions about it.

  • Constitutional and Administrative Law

    Credits: 30

    In this module, we will examine the organs of government, from the monarch, to the Prime Minister, Judges, MPs and beyond, and we will examine the checks and balances put in place to ensure that those in power do not abuse their position. We will take a whistle-stop tour through over 1000 years of history to reach conclusions as to why the UK enjoys an 'unwritten' constitution, and will evaluate its effectiveness. We will also examine some of the key international organisations of which the UK is a signatory to - including the EU and the ECHR - and discuss and debate the impact that membership has had on the lives of the people of the UK.

Level 6

Core Modules

  • User Experience

    Credits: 15

    This module explores the body of knowledge underpinning the topic of User Experience (UX), and how UX approaches can be applied to the design and evaluation of user interfaces.

  • Information Security Management

    Credits: 15

    This module develops the concepts and principles of information security management including its organisational aspects such as security governance, policy procedures and security standards. It covers the relevant methods associated with risk assessment and management. In this module, various issues associated with information assurance, incident management and government legislation on data protection will be presented. This module introduces security controls that are used to protect information and underlying IT systems and infrastructure. Disaster recovery, business continuity management, investigation and digital forensics which are important aspects of information security management will be discussed in this module.

  • Advanced Web Scripting

    Credits: 15

    This module extends the basic web model in two ways. The first looks at the use of client-side scripting to enhance the user experience. This is done by examining the use of Javascript to increase the interactivity of the user view, and to exploit local data storage. The second is to consider the use of services to move beyond a simple HTML page request/response model of interaction. In addition, the module considers the impact of third party tools in developing web applications. For enhancing the user experience this may include interface toolkits such as JQuery. Service-based extensions may include the use of functional libraries such as the Google Maps API.

  • Graduate & Employability Skills

    Credits: 0

    You will be able to access employability and enterprise resources including workshops, online materials and books in order to help you formulate a career or post-graduate study plan. You will have the opportunity to hear speakers from a variety of areas give advice and guidance as to how to enter those fields. You will be required to undertake a certain number of activities chosen by you from a career “menu” and to reflect on what they have learnt in order to complete the module successfully.

  • Company Law

    Credits: 30

    The module will examine the structure of the modern day company in both the public and private form. It will consider the constitution of the company, the rights and duties of directors and shareholders and the interests of employees and creditors. The financing of companies will also be considered, as will the key areas of corporate governance, minority protection and the current reform issues in Company Law as a whole.

Optional

  • Professional Work Placement in Computer Science

    Credits: 0

    Supervised work experience provides students with the opportunity to set their academic studies in a broader context, to gain practical experience in specific technical areas and to strengthen their communication and time-management skills. It greatly assists them in developing as independent learners, so that they will be able to gain maximum benefit from the learning opportunities afforded by their future study programme. It gives them opportunities, according to the nature of the placement experience, to acquire the basis of technical expertise in specialist areas, which they may be able to enhance through study after completion of the placement, especially in the final project.

  • Software Quality

    Credits: 15

    This module provides both a theoretical and practical introduction to quality both in terms of the software development process and the products of that process. It also investigates how quality can be defined and measured, and by analysing actual program code to determine its quality according to pre-determined quality metrics.

  • Enterprise Systems

    Credits: 15

    This module explores different perspectives on the design, management and integration of software systems that support business processes across complex organisations. The first perspective examines the integration and inter-operation of different applications within the same enterprise. The focus is on appropriate approaches and methods for bridging the gap between IT strategy, which aligns business goals and system requirements, and the design and management of individual IT services. This could include, but is not limited to, approaches based on ITIL and/or SOA. The second perspective examines the scalability of systems that provide specific functionality across the whole of an enterprise. This is done by breaking down an application into different tiers and looking at the issues, potential problems and design solutions to enable the delivery of high performance systems. This focus on individual systems is a natural extension to study of design patterns for web applications.

  • Year Abroad

    Credits: 0

    Learning and teaching methods may include taught courses, a research programme, or a mixture of these. components. The Year Abroad will be for TWO academic semesters or their equivalent. The student will follow a programme negotiated by the Study Abroad team or nominee, School Study Abroad Tutor and an equivalent representative of the host institution. Prior to the commencement of the Year Abroad, the student, the appropriate officers from UH and from the host institution will agree a learning contract and mode of attendance. In institutions where the language of instruction is not English, then the learning contract will take into account the students ability in the language of instruction of the host institution. The student will be required to provide evidence of appropriate attainment and ability in the language of instruction of the chosen institution when the language of instruction is not English.

  • Law of Tort

    Credits: 30

    The module considers the law relating to Torts including the tort of negligence, with consideration of 'special duty' topics such as psychiatric injury and economic loss. Statutory torts such as the Occupier's Liability 1957, 1984; Animals Act 1971 and Consumer Protection Act 1987 are also examined. The module also considers intentional torts of assault, battery, false imprisonment and the rule in Wilkinson v Downton. Nuisance and Rylands v Fletcher, together with employer's liability - vicarious and primary non-delegable duty are also covered in the module.

  • Land Law

    Credits: 30

    The module will contain a brief introduction to the meaning of land, the historical development of land law and the formalities for the creation of legal and equitable third party interests in land. A more in-depth study will be made of the registered system (with emphasis on the Land Registration Act 2002), trusts of land (including disputes), resulting and constructive trusts of the family home, proprietary estoppel, co-ownership, leases (with emphasis on enforceability of leasehold covenants), easements, freehold covenants, mortgages and adverse possession.

Fees & funding

The government has yet to announce the upper limit of Tuition Fees for applicants wishing to study an undergraduate course in 2018/19. As soon as this information becomes available, our website will be updated and we will contact everyone who has applied to the University to advise them of their Tuition Fee.

Fees 2017

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1155 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,350 for the 2017 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1420 per 15 credits for the 2017 academic year

Fees 2018

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1155 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,950 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1500 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

View detailed information about tuition fees

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2018

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2019

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Part Time)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)