MSc E-Learning Technology (Online) MSc

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About the course

1/

At the University of Hertfordshire we have been delivering distance-learning courses since 2004. We understand how people learn online, and you can as well with this Master's degree in e-Learning Technology. The online course focuses on e-Learning design and development, enabling you to develop applications that are learner-centred. 

The MSc eLearning Technology draws on the University’s extensive experience in distance-learning, this online Master’s focuses on designing and developing e-Learning, equipping you to develop effective, learner-centred applications.

For more information about how online study works, funding and how to apply, please visit UH Online.

Free sample materials!

See how online study works and what kind of learning environment and materials you will access as an online student.         Access free sample materials

Why choose this course?

  • Gain a master's degree in one year full-time or at a pace that suits you through online study
  • Chose from two different routes depending on your qualifications: an advanced programme for Computer Science graduates - or a route for other graduates that combines foundation modules with options from the advanced modules.
  • Flexible online learning allows you to fit study around your other commitments, without travel and accommodation costs.
  • Gain an internationally-recognised master's degree from the UK's University of Hertfordshire.
  • Benefit from the same academic standards and quality control procedures as our equivalent on campus course
  • We have an excellent track record in research, with over half of our outputs rated at world-leading or internationally excellent in REF 2014, the most recent national assessment.

Entry requirements...

A recent, good bachelors degree (e.g. honours degree from the UK) or equivalent. Plus IELTS 6.0 if your first language is not English.

Applicants who do not wholly meet these requirements, but who are considered to have the professional experience, motivation or potential to succeed at the programme, may also be accepted.

If you do not have the required level of English for entry, our academic English courses can help you to achieve this level.

Careers

Our online masters programme is designed to give graduates the up-to-date skills and knowledge sought after by employers, whether in business, industry, government or research.

There are many opportunities within the rapidly growing e-Learning industry for technical staff who are highly skilled in the application of advanced IT techniques to e-Learning design.

Typical roles could be those found in traditional IT development projects such as Business Analyst, Programmer, User-interface Designer, Quality Controller or Project Manager. Alternatively there are more specialist roles such as Instructional Designer or Learning Technologist.

Teaching methods

Our online degree programmes are taught 100% online when studied independently, or supplemented by tutorial support when studied at a local study centre run by one of our online partners. Find out more about Tutored eLearning. Assessment is by coursework and online tests.

You will participate in the learning experience through the University's on-line learning environment, StudyNet. You will receive learning materials, take part in discussions and submit your assignments online. Additionally, you will receive study resources such as e-books and any specialist software. You will have access to the University's extensive online library facilities, or be able to visit in person if you so choose.

The amount of study time required is no different from that needed for an on campus programme. You should expect to spend at least 30 hours per week if studying full-time, and in proportion if part-time.

Course length

  • Full-time, 1 year - 1.5 years (depending on intake)
  • Part-time, 2-5 years 

For more details about online distance learning, please visit UH Online.

Structure

Year 1

Core Modules

Optional

  • Advanced Database

    This module is primarily designed for students with existing knowledge and experience of database design and implementation, and with an understanding of the underlying theory and practice. The aim of the module is to enhance the students' existing understanding and knowledge through focussed study of selected current and emerging issues in the database field. The study will be grounded in sound understanding of relevant theory, practice and principles and promote a practical understanding and critical awareness of the selected issues. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Contemporary Practices in Information Technology

    This module complements the technical content of the degree programme by introducing you to the legal, ethical and professional landscape in which computing professionals must work. We will present ways of addressing ethical issues you may encounter, and promote a professional approach at a societal level on issues such as sustainable computing. You will also be able to develop and present your own informed opinions on the use of computing and data in society. Legal aspects of the module are based on English Law, and include privacy (data protection), intellectual property and the Computer Misuse Act. However, we do not assume any prior legal knowledge. You will also learn about relevant professional bodies and the support they can provide to computing professionals such as their codes of conduct, and start your journey on the necessarily continuous updating of your knowledge as a professional software practitioner.

  • Distributed Systems Security

    A range of topics will be covered in this module relating to security issues and distributed systems. The detailed content will vary according to current research interests and directions. Case studies will be used. Issues will be considered in relation to each topic as appropriate. The pervasive issues are: models, design, standards, protocols, and performance. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Development

    E-learning applications development is a specific form of technological development activity; we can derive techniques from other development approaches, but educational requirements place particular demands on our work. Developmental techniques for different educational interactions and the selection of appropriate technologies are a central part of the work of this module. We are interested in developmental techniques that can support the creation of e-learning applications that elicit, or are at least more likely to elicit, educationally effective interactions. Examples of e-learning applications include e-assessment applications, intelligent tutoring systems, as well as groupware for facilitating co-operative and collaborative learning activities. This module considers these kinds of applications and how they may be developed.

  • E-Learning Technology MSc Project

    The project is a showpiece opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and skills to the design and development of a computerised solution to a particular problem within the domain of e-learning technology, and in doing so demonstrating what they know about current research and practices in e-learning technology. The project is a self-directed piece of work, conducted with minimum online supervision that demonstrates the student’s ability to plan and manage a substantial piece of work, and steer their own efforts. Students are expected to be thorough in their work, and, particularly, identify and tackle any difficult or challenging aspects of the problems they are trying to solve. It is not just the quantity, or even the quality of work that is considered when grading the project, but the level of difficulty and the scope of the problem being addressed.

  • Interaction Design

    Interaction Design is fundamental to the design of a positive user experience of computing systems in all their diversity. It encompasses the types of interaction we may design and the types of interfaces that may be used in these interactions. This module is principally concerned with how we can enhance and support the user experience with our interaction design work; what factors influence the user experience and how can we take these into account in our design work? Equally, how can we evaluate the final design to ensure it provides effective interaction? In order to answer these questions, the module will consider existing standards and methodologies that may guide us in our work. Students are expected to engage fully with the module activities in order to develop a critical approach to effective interaction design.

  • Learner Centred Design

    Learners are faced with an information ecosystem that is complex, in constant flux and of varying validity and reliability. This places particular demands on how learning technologies may be designed to support learners in their studies. This module is concerned with the particular challenges of producing educationally effective learning designs and draws on a wide range of techniques for supporting this work.

  • Measures and Models for Software Engineering

    In this module we will examine advanced issues of software engineering theory and practice. We will show you how to measure and model a range of software engineering products and processes making up a software project. The software engineering products we will explore in the module will include user requirements, design documents and code. The software engineering processes we will consider in the module will include testing and debugging. The aim of the module is to enable you to use the modelling and measuring of products and processes such as these to make quantified decisions during software development. We will provide a more detailed description of the module content in the module delivery information for students.

  • Mobile Standards, Interfaces and Applications

    Mobile and pervasive computing is a rapidly evolving area and so the main body of knowledge will be taught through the close reading of the most up-to-date research in the area. Themes covered could include pervasive computing, mobile HCI, privacy and security, location and context awareness, technological transparency vs proactivity, mobile development platforms, networking and data standards. Ensuring deep and broad background in these ideas constitutes the seminal part of the course. Alongside this runs a practical course in programming for mobile devices based on one of the popular development platforms. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Multicast and Multimedia Networking

    How do we deal efficiently with applications that have to send the same data to many different destinations? How can a network mix applications with very different quality of service requirements? This module addresses these and other problems that must be solved if we are to integrate the gamut of diverse network applications onto a single network infrastructure. It exposes students to some of the most important developments in computer networking. By the end of the module, you will be familiar with most of the important issues and ideas in applying high-speed network technology to applications with diverse quality of service requirements. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Programming and Program Design

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Secure Systems Programming

    The variety and proliferation of passive and active malicious attacks made against users of networks and distributed systems has led to a need for pro-active defence mechanisms against such attackers. For an individual, the inconvenience of being attacked can range from being extremely frustrating to downright expensive with slow to no service at all on their computer. For a company it too can be frustrating and costly both financially and to their reputation. This module will be both theoretical and practical, exploring concepts and applications from the fields of computer systems and their security weaknesses. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Software Development Tools and Methods

    This module introduces students to industry standard and current best practice via exploring and using tools and techniques used in the process of developing software systems. The module encourages a critical approach by looking at the suitability of different methods, tools and techniques for different systems. The module blends theory and practise with practical activity based around Unified Modelling Language (UML). A lot of time will be spent using tools to develop models of computer based solutions to various problems. The emphasis of the module is on analysis and design, but Java will be used where we need to show how design decisions affect implementation. This is used to produce models of the system at various stages in a software project, and to illustrate how these models can be elaborated from analysis through to design, implementation and deployment.

  • Software Engineering Practice and Experience

    This module gives students the opportunity to extend their understanding and experience of software engineering practice. It offers students exposure to the development and evolution of software. The module is very practical and is based around a substantial piece of software. The aim of the module is to enable students to develop software engineering knowledge and skills that are transferable to software companies. The module covers each element of the software engineering process. It explores the use of overarching development approaches such as eXtreme Programming and Component Based Software Engineering. Students are usually requested to refer, assess and adopt leading edge practices, which could include program slicing to find code faults, and technologies (such as bug tracking systems). Specialised software development approaches are also investigated, such as those required for application areas such as safety critical systems. Process models popular with industry, which could include one of the SEI models, are also used and evaluated during this module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Web Scripting and Application Development

    Making a successful community web application requires a synthesis of varied skills. Firstly you need to identify a niche community and then produce a site with features which will satisfy that community. However, those features will be the result of a lot of careful consideration at the level of database design, user interface design and the establishment of a clear business logic in the application. This course therefore is about how to bring these things together in a site that users will wish to use.

  • Web Services

    The term "web services" is used to define a number of protocols and technologies used to implement a service-oriented architecture. These standards are designed to support the notion of using "standardised" interfaces to allow communication, integration and co-ordination of information between applications distributed over and accessible through a decentralised network environment. This module develops students' understanding of the fundamental architectures of web services and the protocols and standards that underpin them. The module provides only a brief introduction to the basic technologies and associated practical skills before moving on to focus on architectural issues and evaluation of different technologies and their developments. This will be done in the context of specific applications and/or enterprises. Examples could include applications within e-commerce, information retrieval and knowledge management. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Wireless, Mobile and Ad-hoc Networking

    How can we cope with users and computers that move from place to place, and yet wish to remain in contact with the net? This module looks at a range of wireless communications technologies, and addresses some of the problems of mobile ad-hoc and wireless networks. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

Year 2

Core Modules

Optional

  • Advanced Database

    This module is primarily designed for students with existing knowledge and experience of database design and implementation, and with an understanding of the underlying theory and practice. The aim of the module is to enhance the students' existing understanding and knowledge through focussed study of selected current and emerging issues in the database field. The study will be grounded in sound understanding of relevant theory, practice and principles and promote a practical understanding and critical awareness of the selected issues. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Contemporary Practices in Information Technology

    This module complements the technical content of the degree programme by introducing you to the legal, ethical and professional landscape in which computing professionals must work. We will present ways of addressing ethical issues you may encounter, and promote a professional approach at a societal level on issues such as sustainable computing. You will also be able to develop and present your own informed opinions on the use of computing and data in society. Legal aspects of the module are based on English Law, and include privacy (data protection), intellectual property and the Computer Misuse Act. However, we do not assume any prior legal knowledge. You will also learn about relevant professional bodies and the support they can provide to computing professionals such as their codes of conduct, and start your journey on the necessarily continuous updating of your knowledge as a professional software practitioner.

  • Distributed Systems Security

    A range of topics will be covered in this module relating to security issues and distributed systems. The detailed content will vary according to current research interests and directions. Case studies will be used. Issues will be considered in relation to each topic as appropriate. The pervasive issues are: models, design, standards, protocols, and performance. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Development

    E-learning applications development is a specific form of technological development activity; we can derive techniques from other development approaches, but educational requirements place particular demands on our work. Developmental techniques for different educational interactions and the selection of appropriate technologies are a central part of the work of this module. We are interested in developmental techniques that can support the creation of e-learning applications that elicit, or are at least more likely to elicit, educationally effective interactions. Examples of e-learning applications include e-assessment applications, intelligent tutoring systems, as well as groupware for facilitating co-operative and collaborative learning activities. This module considers these kinds of applications and how they may be developed.

  • E-Learning Technology MSc Project

    The project is a showpiece opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and skills to the design and development of a computerised solution to a particular problem within the domain of e-learning technology, and in doing so demonstrating what they know about current research and practices in e-learning technology. The project is a self-directed piece of work, conducted with minimum online supervision that demonstrates the student’s ability to plan and manage a substantial piece of work, and steer their own efforts. Students are expected to be thorough in their work, and, particularly, identify and tackle any difficult or challenging aspects of the problems they are trying to solve. It is not just the quantity, or even the quality of work that is considered when grading the project, but the level of difficulty and the scope of the problem being addressed.

  • Interaction Design

    Interaction Design is fundamental to the design of a positive user experience of computing systems in all their diversity. It encompasses the types of interaction we may design and the types of interfaces that may be used in these interactions. This module is principally concerned with how we can enhance and support the user experience with our interaction design work; what factors influence the user experience and how can we take these into account in our design work? Equally, how can we evaluate the final design to ensure it provides effective interaction? In order to answer these questions, the module will consider existing standards and methodologies that may guide us in our work. Students are expected to engage fully with the module activities in order to develop a critical approach to effective interaction design.

  • Learner Centred Design

    Learners are faced with an information ecosystem that is complex, in constant flux and of varying validity and reliability. This places particular demands on how learning technologies may be designed to support learners in their studies. This module is concerned with the particular challenges of producing educationally effective learning designs and draws on a wide range of techniques for supporting this work.

  • Measures and Models for Software Engineering

    In this module we will examine advanced issues of software engineering theory and practice. We will show you how to measure and model a range of software engineering products and processes making up a software project. The software engineering products we will explore in the module will include user requirements, design documents and code. The software engineering processes we will consider in the module will include testing and debugging. The aim of the module is to enable you to use the modelling and measuring of products and processes such as these to make quantified decisions during software development. We will provide a more detailed description of the module content in the module delivery information for students.

  • Mobile Standards, Interfaces and Applications

    Mobile and pervasive computing is a rapidly evolving area and so the main body of knowledge will be taught through the close reading of the most up-to-date research in the area. Themes covered could include pervasive computing, mobile HCI, privacy and security, location and context awareness, technological transparency vs proactivity, mobile development platforms, networking and data standards. Ensuring deep and broad background in these ideas constitutes the seminal part of the course. Alongside this runs a practical course in programming for mobile devices based on one of the popular development platforms. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Multicast and Multimedia Networking

    How do we deal efficiently with applications that have to send the same data to many different destinations? How can a network mix applications with very different quality of service requirements? This module addresses these and other problems that must be solved if we are to integrate the gamut of diverse network applications onto a single network infrastructure. It exposes students to some of the most important developments in computer networking. By the end of the module, you will be familiar with most of the important issues and ideas in applying high-speed network technology to applications with diverse quality of service requirements. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Programming and Program Design

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Secure Systems Programming

    The variety and proliferation of passive and active malicious attacks made against users of networks and distributed systems has led to a need for pro-active defence mechanisms against such attackers. For an individual, the inconvenience of being attacked can range from being extremely frustrating to downright expensive with slow to no service at all on their computer. For a company it too can be frustrating and costly both financially and to their reputation. This module will be both theoretical and practical, exploring concepts and applications from the fields of computer systems and their security weaknesses. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Software Development Tools and Methods

    This module introduces students to industry standard and current best practice via exploring and using tools and techniques used in the process of developing software systems. The module encourages a critical approach by looking at the suitability of different methods, tools and techniques for different systems. The module blends theory and practise with practical activity based around Unified Modelling Language (UML). A lot of time will be spent using tools to develop models of computer based solutions to various problems. The emphasis of the module is on analysis and design, but Java will be used where we need to show how design decisions affect implementation. This is used to produce models of the system at various stages in a software project, and to illustrate how these models can be elaborated from analysis through to design, implementation and deployment.

  • Software Engineering Practice and Experience

    This module gives students the opportunity to extend their understanding and experience of software engineering practice. It offers students exposure to the development and evolution of software. The module is very practical and is based around a substantial piece of software. The aim of the module is to enable students to develop software engineering knowledge and skills that are transferable to software companies. The module covers each element of the software engineering process. It explores the use of overarching development approaches such as eXtreme Programming and Component Based Software Engineering. Students are usually requested to refer, assess and adopt leading edge practices, which could include program slicing to find code faults, and technologies (such as bug tracking systems). Specialised software development approaches are also investigated, such as those required for application areas such as safety critical systems. Process models popular with industry, which could include one of the SEI models, are also used and evaluated during this module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Web Scripting and Application Development

    Making a successful community web application requires a synthesis of varied skills. Firstly you need to identify a niche community and then produce a site with features which will satisfy that community. However, those features will be the result of a lot of careful consideration at the level of database design, user interface design and the establishment of a clear business logic in the application. This course therefore is about how to bring these things together in a site that users will wish to use.

  • Web Services

    The term "web services" is used to define a number of protocols and technologies used to implement a service-oriented architecture. These standards are designed to support the notion of using "standardised" interfaces to allow communication, integration and co-ordination of information between applications distributed over and accessible through a decentralised network environment. This module develops students' understanding of the fundamental architectures of web services and the protocols and standards that underpin them. The module provides only a brief introduction to the basic technologies and associated practical skills before moving on to focus on architectural issues and evaluation of different technologies and their developments. This will be done in the context of specific applications and/or enterprises. Examples could include applications within e-commerce, information retrieval and knowledge management. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Wireless, Mobile and Ad-hoc Networking

    How can we cope with users and computers that move from place to place, and yet wish to remain in contact with the net? This module looks at a range of wireless communications technologies, and addresses some of the problems of mobile ad-hoc and wireless networks. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

Year 3

Core Modules

Optional

  • Advanced Database

    This module is primarily designed for students with existing knowledge and experience of database design and implementation, and with an understanding of the underlying theory and practice. The aim of the module is to enhance the students' existing understanding and knowledge through focussed study of selected current and emerging issues in the database field. The study will be grounded in sound understanding of relevant theory, practice and principles and promote a practical understanding and critical awareness of the selected issues. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Contemporary Practices in Information Technology

    This module complements the technical content of the degree programme by introducing you to the legal, ethical and professional landscape in which computing professionals must work. We will present ways of addressing ethical issues you may encounter, and promote a professional approach at a societal level on issues such as sustainable computing. You will also be able to develop and present your own informed opinions on the use of computing and data in society. Legal aspects of the module are based on English Law, and include privacy (data protection), intellectual property and the Computer Misuse Act. However, we do not assume any prior legal knowledge. You will also learn about relevant professional bodies and the support they can provide to computing professionals such as their codes of conduct, and start your journey on the necessarily continuous updating of your knowledge as a professional software practitioner.

  • Distributed Systems Security

    A range of topics will be covered in this module relating to security issues and distributed systems. The detailed content will vary according to current research interests and directions. Case studies will be used. Issues will be considered in relation to each topic as appropriate. The pervasive issues are: models, design, standards, protocols, and performance. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Development

    E-learning applications development is a specific form of technological development activity; we can derive techniques from other development approaches, but educational requirements place particular demands on our work. Developmental techniques for different educational interactions and the selection of appropriate technologies are a central part of the work of this module. We are interested in developmental techniques that can support the creation of e-learning applications that elicit, or are at least more likely to elicit, educationally effective interactions. Examples of e-learning applications include e-assessment applications, intelligent tutoring systems, as well as groupware for facilitating co-operative and collaborative learning activities. This module considers these kinds of applications and how they may be developed.

  • E-Learning Technology MSc Project

    The project is a showpiece opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and skills to the design and development of a computerised solution to a particular problem within the domain of e-learning technology, and in doing so demonstrating what they know about current research and practices in e-learning technology. The project is a self-directed piece of work, conducted with minimum online supervision that demonstrates the student’s ability to plan and manage a substantial piece of work, and steer their own efforts. Students are expected to be thorough in their work, and, particularly, identify and tackle any difficult or challenging aspects of the problems they are trying to solve. It is not just the quantity, or even the quality of work that is considered when grading the project, but the level of difficulty and the scope of the problem being addressed.

  • Interaction Design

    Interaction Design is fundamental to the design of a positive user experience of computing systems in all their diversity. It encompasses the types of interaction we may design and the types of interfaces that may be used in these interactions. This module is principally concerned with how we can enhance and support the user experience with our interaction design work; what factors influence the user experience and how can we take these into account in our design work? Equally, how can we evaluate the final design to ensure it provides effective interaction? In order to answer these questions, the module will consider existing standards and methodologies that may guide us in our work. Students are expected to engage fully with the module activities in order to develop a critical approach to effective interaction design.

  • Learner Centred Design

    Learners are faced with an information ecosystem that is complex, in constant flux and of varying validity and reliability. This places particular demands on how learning technologies may be designed to support learners in their studies. This module is concerned with the particular challenges of producing educationally effective learning designs and draws on a wide range of techniques for supporting this work.

  • Measures and Models for Software Engineering

    In this module we will examine advanced issues of software engineering theory and practice. We will show you how to measure and model a range of software engineering products and processes making up a software project. The software engineering products we will explore in the module will include user requirements, design documents and code. The software engineering processes we will consider in the module will include testing and debugging. The aim of the module is to enable you to use the modelling and measuring of products and processes such as these to make quantified decisions during software development. We will provide a more detailed description of the module content in the module delivery information for students.

  • Mobile Standards, Interfaces and Applications

    Mobile and pervasive computing is a rapidly evolving area and so the main body of knowledge will be taught through the close reading of the most up-to-date research in the area. Themes covered could include pervasive computing, mobile HCI, privacy and security, location and context awareness, technological transparency vs proactivity, mobile development platforms, networking and data standards. Ensuring deep and broad background in these ideas constitutes the seminal part of the course. Alongside this runs a practical course in programming for mobile devices based on one of the popular development platforms. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Multicast and Multimedia Networking

    How do we deal efficiently with applications that have to send the same data to many different destinations? How can a network mix applications with very different quality of service requirements? This module addresses these and other problems that must be solved if we are to integrate the gamut of diverse network applications onto a single network infrastructure. It exposes students to some of the most important developments in computer networking. By the end of the module, you will be familiar with most of the important issues and ideas in applying high-speed network technology to applications with diverse quality of service requirements. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Programming and Program Design

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Secure Systems Programming

    The variety and proliferation of passive and active malicious attacks made against users of networks and distributed systems has led to a need for pro-active defence mechanisms against such attackers. For an individual, the inconvenience of being attacked can range from being extremely frustrating to downright expensive with slow to no service at all on their computer. For a company it too can be frustrating and costly both financially and to their reputation. This module will be both theoretical and practical, exploring concepts and applications from the fields of computer systems and their security weaknesses. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Software Development Tools and Methods

    This module introduces students to industry standard and current best practice via exploring and using tools and techniques used in the process of developing software systems. The module encourages a critical approach by looking at the suitability of different methods, tools and techniques for different systems. The module blends theory and practise with practical activity based around Unified Modelling Language (UML). A lot of time will be spent using tools to develop models of computer based solutions to various problems. The emphasis of the module is on analysis and design, but Java will be used where we need to show how design decisions affect implementation. This is used to produce models of the system at various stages in a software project, and to illustrate how these models can be elaborated from analysis through to design, implementation and deployment.

  • Software Engineering Practice and Experience

    This module gives students the opportunity to extend their understanding and experience of software engineering practice. It offers students exposure to the development and evolution of software. The module is very practical and is based around a substantial piece of software. The aim of the module is to enable students to develop software engineering knowledge and skills that are transferable to software companies. The module covers each element of the software engineering process. It explores the use of overarching development approaches such as eXtreme Programming and Component Based Software Engineering. Students are usually requested to refer, assess and adopt leading edge practices, which could include program slicing to find code faults, and technologies (such as bug tracking systems). Specialised software development approaches are also investigated, such as those required for application areas such as safety critical systems. Process models popular with industry, which could include one of the SEI models, are also used and evaluated during this module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Web Scripting and Application Development

    Making a successful community web application requires a synthesis of varied skills. Firstly you need to identify a niche community and then produce a site with features which will satisfy that community. However, those features will be the result of a lot of careful consideration at the level of database design, user interface design and the establishment of a clear business logic in the application. This course therefore is about how to bring these things together in a site that users will wish to use.

  • Web Services

    The term "web services" is used to define a number of protocols and technologies used to implement a service-oriented architecture. These standards are designed to support the notion of using "standardised" interfaces to allow communication, integration and co-ordination of information between applications distributed over and accessible through a decentralised network environment. This module develops students' understanding of the fundamental architectures of web services and the protocols and standards that underpin them. The module provides only a brief introduction to the basic technologies and associated practical skills before moving on to focus on architectural issues and evaluation of different technologies and their developments. This will be done in the context of specific applications and/or enterprises. Examples could include applications within e-commerce, information retrieval and knowledge management. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Wireless, Mobile and Ad-hoc Networking

    How can we cope with users and computers that move from place to place, and yet wish to remain in contact with the net? This module looks at a range of wireless communications technologies, and addresses some of the problems of mobile ad-hoc and wireless networks. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

Year 4

Core Modules

Optional

  • Advanced Database

    This module is primarily designed for students with existing knowledge and experience of database design and implementation, and with an understanding of the underlying theory and practice. The aim of the module is to enhance the students' existing understanding and knowledge through focussed study of selected current and emerging issues in the database field. The study will be grounded in sound understanding of relevant theory, practice and principles and promote a practical understanding and critical awareness of the selected issues. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Contemporary Practices in Information Technology

    This module complements the technical content of the degree programme by introducing you to the legal, ethical and professional landscape in which computing professionals must work. We will present ways of addressing ethical issues you may encounter, and promote a professional approach at a societal level on issues such as sustainable computing. You will also be able to develop and present your own informed opinions on the use of computing and data in society. Legal aspects of the module are based on English Law, and include privacy (data protection), intellectual property and the Computer Misuse Act. However, we do not assume any prior legal knowledge. You will also learn about relevant professional bodies and the support they can provide to computing professionals such as their codes of conduct, and start your journey on the necessarily continuous updating of your knowledge as a professional software practitioner.

  • Distributed Systems Security

    A range of topics will be covered in this module relating to security issues and distributed systems. The detailed content will vary according to current research interests and directions. Case studies will be used. Issues will be considered in relation to each topic as appropriate. The pervasive issues are: models, design, standards, protocols, and performance. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Development

    E-learning applications development is a specific form of technological development activity; we can derive techniques from other development approaches, but educational requirements place particular demands on our work. Developmental techniques for different educational interactions and the selection of appropriate technologies are a central part of the work of this module. We are interested in developmental techniques that can support the creation of e-learning applications that elicit, or are at least more likely to elicit, educationally effective interactions. Examples of e-learning applications include e-assessment applications, intelligent tutoring systems, as well as groupware for facilitating co-operative and collaborative learning activities. This module considers these kinds of applications and how they may be developed.

  • E-Learning Technology MSc Project

    The project is a showpiece opportunity for students to apply their knowledge and skills to the design and development of a computerised solution to a particular problem within the domain of e-learning technology, and in doing so demonstrating what they know about current research and practices in e-learning technology. The project is a self-directed piece of work, conducted with minimum online supervision that demonstrates the student’s ability to plan and manage a substantial piece of work, and steer their own efforts. Students are expected to be thorough in their work, and, particularly, identify and tackle any difficult or challenging aspects of the problems they are trying to solve. It is not just the quantity, or even the quality of work that is considered when grading the project, but the level of difficulty and the scope of the problem being addressed.

  • Interaction Design

    Interaction Design is fundamental to the design of a positive user experience of computing systems in all their diversity. It encompasses the types of interaction we may design and the types of interfaces that may be used in these interactions. This module is principally concerned with how we can enhance and support the user experience with our interaction design work; what factors influence the user experience and how can we take these into account in our design work? Equally, how can we evaluate the final design to ensure it provides effective interaction? In order to answer these questions, the module will consider existing standards and methodologies that may guide us in our work. Students are expected to engage fully with the module activities in order to develop a critical approach to effective interaction design.

  • Learner Centred Design

    Learners are faced with an information ecosystem that is complex, in constant flux and of varying validity and reliability. This places particular demands on how learning technologies may be designed to support learners in their studies. This module is concerned with the particular challenges of producing educationally effective learning designs and draws on a wide range of techniques for supporting this work.

  • Measures and Models for Software Engineering

    In this module we will examine advanced issues of software engineering theory and practice. We will show you how to measure and model a range of software engineering products and processes making up a software project. The software engineering products we will explore in the module will include user requirements, design documents and code. The software engineering processes we will consider in the module will include testing and debugging. The aim of the module is to enable you to use the modelling and measuring of products and processes such as these to make quantified decisions during software development. We will provide a more detailed description of the module content in the module delivery information for students.

  • Mobile Standards, Interfaces and Applications

    Mobile and pervasive computing is a rapidly evolving area and so the main body of knowledge will be taught through the close reading of the most up-to-date research in the area. Themes covered could include pervasive computing, mobile HCI, privacy and security, location and context awareness, technological transparency vs proactivity, mobile development platforms, networking and data standards. Ensuring deep and broad background in these ideas constitutes the seminal part of the course. Alongside this runs a practical course in programming for mobile devices based on one of the popular development platforms. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Multicast and Multimedia Networking

    How do we deal efficiently with applications that have to send the same data to many different destinations? How can a network mix applications with very different quality of service requirements? This module addresses these and other problems that must be solved if we are to integrate the gamut of diverse network applications onto a single network infrastructure. It exposes students to some of the most important developments in computer networking. By the end of the module, you will be familiar with most of the important issues and ideas in applying high-speed network technology to applications with diverse quality of service requirements. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Programming and Program Design

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Secure Systems Programming

    The variety and proliferation of passive and active malicious attacks made against users of networks and distributed systems has led to a need for pro-active defence mechanisms against such attackers. For an individual, the inconvenience of being attacked can range from being extremely frustrating to downright expensive with slow to no service at all on their computer. For a company it too can be frustrating and costly both financially and to their reputation. This module will be both theoretical and practical, exploring concepts and applications from the fields of computer systems and their security weaknesses. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Software Development Tools and Methods

    This module introduces students to industry standard and current best practice via exploring and using tools and techniques used in the process of developing software systems. The module encourages a critical approach by looking at the suitability of different methods, tools and techniques for different systems. The module blends theory and practise with practical activity based around Unified Modelling Language (UML). A lot of time will be spent using tools to develop models of computer based solutions to various problems. The emphasis of the module is on analysis and design, but Java will be used where we need to show how design decisions affect implementation. This is used to produce models of the system at various stages in a software project, and to illustrate how these models can be elaborated from analysis through to design, implementation and deployment.

  • Software Engineering Practice and Experience

    This module gives students the opportunity to extend their understanding and experience of software engineering practice. It offers students exposure to the development and evolution of software. The module is very practical and is based around a substantial piece of software. The aim of the module is to enable students to develop software engineering knowledge and skills that are transferable to software companies. The module covers each element of the software engineering process. It explores the use of overarching development approaches such as eXtreme Programming and Component Based Software Engineering. Students are usually requested to refer, assess and adopt leading edge practices, which could include program slicing to find code faults, and technologies (such as bug tracking systems). Specialised software development approaches are also investigated, such as those required for application areas such as safety critical systems. Process models popular with industry, which could include one of the SEI models, are also used and evaluated during this module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Web Scripting and Application Development

    Making a successful community web application requires a synthesis of varied skills. Firstly you need to identify a niche community and then produce a site with features which will satisfy that community. However, those features will be the result of a lot of careful consideration at the level of database design, user interface design and the establishment of a clear business logic in the application. This course therefore is about how to bring these things together in a site that users will wish to use.

  • Web Services

    The term "web services" is used to define a number of protocols and technologies used to implement a service-oriented architecture. These standards are designed to support the notion of using "standardised" interfaces to allow communication, integration and co-ordination of information between applications distributed over and accessible through a decentralised network environment. This module develops students' understanding of the fundamental architectures of web services and the protocols and standards that underpin them. The module provides only a brief introduction to the basic technologies and associated practical skills before moving on to focus on architectural issues and evaluation of different technologies and their developments. This will be done in the context of specific applications and/or enterprises. Examples could include applications within e-commerce, information retrieval and knowledge management. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Wireless, Mobile and Ad-hoc Networking

    How can we cope with users and computers that move from place to place, and yet wish to remain in contact with the net? This module looks at a range of wireless communications technologies, and addresses some of the problems of mobile ad-hoc and wireless networks. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

Fees & funding

Fees 2016

This course is studied part time over 2 to 5 years, or full time over 1 year to 18 months. You will need 180 credits to achieve the qualification.

A typical part time study rate is 60 credits per year, based on this level of study the total cost per year will be £2140.

A typical full time study is 120 credits per year, based on this level of study the total cost per year will be £4280.

Total course fee for enrolment in the academic year 2016/17 is £6420. *

There are three payment options:

  • Pay the total course fee up front
  • Pay only for the modules you are registered on
  • Pay in monthly instalments per year

Please note that there is a £100 deposit for new students to pay upon enrolment to cover course materials, which will be refunded at the end of first semester of study

*Fees are subject to change in line with government changes and inflation

Additional course-related costs

There may be some additional costs or charges associated with studying on this course. These costs or charges may be compulsory (ie you have to pay them if you are studying this course) or they may be optional (ie you don’t have to pay them, but they may help you get the most out of your course).

Any such costs or charges will be outlined in the About your course factsheet that can be found on the course Overview page.

Additional course costs

For more details about fees and funding visit UH Online's fees page

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

How to apply

2016

Start DateEnd DateLink
16/01/201713/01/2018Apply online (Distance (Part Time))

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
25/09/201730/09/2018Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
25/09/201730/05/2018Apply online (Distance (Part Time))
15/01/201813/01/2019Apply online (Distance (Part Time))

2018

Start DateEnd DateLink
25/09/201830/09/2019Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
25/09/201830/05/2019Apply online (Distance (Part Time))
15/01/201913/01/2020Apply online (Distance (Part Time))