BSc (Hons) Computer Science (Online) BSc (Hons)

Study online

About the course

1/

The University of Hertfordshire has one of the largest Computer Science programmes on campus in the UK. Studying online with the School of Computer Science puts you at the heart of a learning experience that has successfully delivered educational and career benefits to students and professionals around the world.

Whether you want to boost your employability or improve your prospects of promotion, the BSc (Hons) Computer Science (online) is a challenging course that can help you develop the knowledge and skills you need to build a successful career. The online course is very similar to the campus based BSc and the academic standards required are just as high as those for the on-campus equivalent. this is no soft option. Our programmes demand concentration, commitment and hard work; this experience will change your life, broaden your mind and give you a sense of achieving something amazing! 

Top-up course

If you already have a Computing or Information Technology based qualification that is equivalent to the second year (Level 5) of a Bachelor of Science degree, you can join the final year (Level 6) of our programme. This allows you to top-up to an Honours degree in either 1 year (full-time), or over 2 years (part-time).

You will need 240 credits from a BTEC Higher National Diploma, UK Foundation degree, Associate degree, IMIS Higher Diploma, or equivalent Level 5/two-year post-school qualification. The subject of your qualification should be computing-related.

Upcoming online open day!

Join us for our next online open day on the 11 May 2016 from 4pm to 5pm. Event info and registration form.

Free sample materials!

See how online study works and what kind of learning environment and materials you will access as an online student.         Access free sample materials 

Why choose this course?

  • You can study when and where you want, fitting in with your other commitments such as work or family
  • Our online degrees are based on their on campus equivalents with the same academic quality standards and processes so your award will be recognized worldwide
  • Study at a highly-regarded, well established computer science department with excellent facilities, strong links to both business and research, and a track record of graduate success.
  • BSc (Hons) Information Technology also available to study online. 

For more information about how online study works, funding and how to apply, please visit UH Online.

Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire

See how The School of Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire leads the industry with its world class research and strong links with businesses.

Entry requirements...

Minimum 260 points. Plus GCSE English Language and Mathematics at Grade C or above. Or equivalent.

Our offer for the International Baccalaureate Diploma (IB) is made outside of the UCAS Tariff and is calculated by multiplying the IB score by 10 i.e. 28 IB points will be counted as 280 UCAS points.

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency. The following qualifications and grades will be considered 
- GCSE English language grade A-C 
- IELTS 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any band)
Other English language tests are accepted. Please contact the International Office for details.

If you do not have the required level of English for entry, our academic English and foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

What our
students say

What our<br>students say
"

The course was very well organized and you always know what to expect, which allows you to set your own schedule.

-Arielle Bonnici, BSc (Hons) Computer Science

Careers

Several thousands of UH computer science graduates have moved into a wide range of careers; many are now in senior positions in the UK and throughout the world.

Initial job roles have included programmer, software developer, business analyst, software engineer, webmaster, database administrator, network designer, and technical consultant.

This particular degree title retains flexibility and hence is preparation for a wide variety of careers in many areas of computing or software development.

Teaching methods

With online study, you study at your own choice of time and place, saving on travel and accommodation costs and fitting in with your other commitments.

Our programmes begin on specific dates, you study as a small group, there are deadlines for coursework assignments and online tests with a fixed 24-hour period to take them in. This way you combine the flexibility of distance learning with the self-discipline and community spirit of conventional tuition. Our students come from all over the world so you will have a great opportunity to gain first-hand experience of global networking.

With online study, you use the Internet for learning: to access course information, to communicate with others, and to transmit completed assignments for marking. We take advantage of online technologies to provide faster and more effective communication and to deliver much richer learning materials than is normally possible with other forms of distance learning.

This means that wherever you are in the world, providing you have access to a suitable PC and Internet connection, you can study for a University of Hertfordshire award without attending the University in person.

Course Length

For entry at Level 4 the programme in its entirety is offered in two study patterns:

  • an entirely part-time study pattern (6 years in duration) or 
  • a study pattern which offers part-time study for levels 4 and 5 and then full-time study for level 6 (5 years in duration).

For entry at Level 6 the programme in its entirety is offered in two study patterns:

  • an entirely part-time study pattern (2 years in duration) or
  • an entirely full-time study pattern (1 year in duration)

Period review February 2016

The revalidation event for the BSc Computer Science online programme took place on Friday 26th February 2016. The panel approved the new programme for a period of 6 years, with no conditions apart from the standard ones related to the appointment of an external examiner and sign off of the programme specification. There are a few additional internal standard Quality Assurance procedures to be taken before the new programme specification will be published.

For more information about online distance learning visit: go.herts.ac.uk/online

Structure

Year 1

Core Modules

Optional

  • Business Information Systems

    This module will partly lead on from the databases module however its primary focus will be what types of systems are used in business, how they are used and how they might be built. A range of business systems will be explored both in terms of the business need for which they were developed and the sector and legal context. Some tools and techniques that might be used to assist with transferring the business needs to an application specification will be explored and a range of process models will be presented to match the varying requirements. Students will have an opportunity to develop their understanding of the process of building IS business applications skills through the requirements analysis phase for a given case study. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Data Driven Systems

    This module provides an introduction to database systems. It takes a practical approach using example applications or case studies. It then builds on this application experience to cover questions of why and how databases are designed and used. This will include practical experience of using a database management system, in particular of using simple SQL to query a database, and thus facilitating the view of the database as part of a larger system. Later in the module underlying formalisms will be studied but from an application-down standpoint -to inform understanding rather than as a subject for study in its own right.

  • E-Media Design

    There is a long tradition on computer science programmes of teaching about the relationship between data structures and algorithms. Data these days are commonly images, animations, sounds and video, as well as text and numerical characters, and the ways of putting these data together are more varied than ever before. Yet the choice of data construct still depends on the processes you intend to use on that data and the processes you can apply depend on the choice of data structure. On this module, we will examine what motivates design decisions, the importance of creating systems that are fit for their intended purpose and enable students to make straightforward design decisions of their own. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Foundations of Computation

    This module aims to introduce students to a number of principles that underlie computation and computer-based systems, and how they may be modelled. Both the static and dynamic aspects of systems are considered, with computation being viewed both in functional terms, and as a series of state transitions defined over abstract or virtual machines. The module is intended to provide students with a clear concept of a formal approach to the modelling and specification of computational systems, and to introduce basic formalisms of importance throughout computing. The module will also seek to illustrate some of the ways in which the use of formalisms in modelling and specification can aid those involved in the design, development and operation of computer-based systems. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Internet Technologies

    This module introduces the underlying infrastructure of the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW). In addition, students will examine how the client-server model works and how it is applied to Internet applications. To this end, students will implement straightforward static and dynamic web pages. Dynamic web pages may also include data retrieved from a database. This module includes basic concepts of: Internet Protocol (IP), TCP (Transfer Control Protocol), HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Internet Service Providers (ISPs), the Domain Name System (DNS), client-server model, mark-up languages, client-side programming and server-side programming. At the end of the module, successful students will be able to solve simple problems in the implementation and maintenance of applications for the Internet environment. Further details on how the learning outcomes of the module will be achieved will be described in the module guide. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Principles of Networked Systems

    Computer networks underpin almost every form of computing application, so it is important to appreciate the principles of operation these networks. But computer networks are also extremely complex and hard to understand. This module looks at network applications, and the requirements that different kinds of application demand of the underlying network, and how those requirements may be characterised. It then looks at the performance of networks, and why the network so often seems to be a bottleneck in computer applications. This will lead us into an increasingly detailed examination of what happens when network applications are executed, and introduce some of the more important terminology and principles of the subject. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery guide.

  • Programming & Program Design 1

    This module is concerned with developing further the skills necessary to produce a computer-based solution to more complex specified problems in a high level language. Students will gain an appreciation of some of the issues in program design and will be given the opportunity to make informed decisions in their practical work based on some of the principles of good program design. There will also be emphasis on professional issues such as adequate testing, use of de-bugging techniques and documentation. Program code will be expected not only to meet given specification, but also to be readable, maintainable and well designed. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Programming Principles

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in a high level language. The emphasis will be on basic programming principles : the structure and syntax of a program in the given programming language, variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures (sequence, selection, iteration and subroutine call),modularisation(including procedures/functions). Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • System Requirements

    * have an understanding of the principal stages of requirements engineering and the key challenges in developing usable requirements specifications; * appreciate the range and different types of requirements including both functional and non-functional requirements.

Year 2

Core Modules

Optional

  • Business Information Systems

    This module will partly lead on from the databases module however its primary focus will be what types of systems are used in business, how they are used and how they might be built. A range of business systems will be explored both in terms of the business need for which they were developed and the sector and legal context. Some tools and techniques that might be used to assist with transferring the business needs to an application specification will be explored and a range of process models will be presented to match the varying requirements. Students will have an opportunity to develop their understanding of the process of building IS business applications skills through the requirements analysis phase for a given case study. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Data Driven Systems

    This module provides an introduction to database systems. It takes a practical approach using example applications or case studies. It then builds on this application experience to cover questions of why and how databases are designed and used. This will include practical experience of using a database management system, in particular of using simple SQL to query a database, and thus facilitating the view of the database as part of a larger system. Later in the module underlying formalisms will be studied but from an application-down standpoint -to inform understanding rather than as a subject for study in its own right.

  • E-Media Design

    There is a long tradition on computer science programmes of teaching about the relationship between data structures and algorithms. Data these days are commonly images, animations, sounds and video, as well as text and numerical characters, and the ways of putting these data together are more varied than ever before. Yet the choice of data construct still depends on the processes you intend to use on that data and the processes you can apply depend on the choice of data structure. On this module, we will examine what motivates design decisions, the importance of creating systems that are fit for their intended purpose and enable students to make straightforward design decisions of their own. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Foundations of Computation

    This module aims to introduce students to a number of principles that underlie computation and computer-based systems, and how they may be modelled. Both the static and dynamic aspects of systems are considered, with computation being viewed both in functional terms, and as a series of state transitions defined over abstract or virtual machines. The module is intended to provide students with a clear concept of a formal approach to the modelling and specification of computational systems, and to introduce basic formalisms of importance throughout computing. The module will also seek to illustrate some of the ways in which the use of formalisms in modelling and specification can aid those involved in the design, development and operation of computer-based systems. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Internet Technologies

    This module introduces the underlying infrastructure of the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW). In addition, students will examine how the client-server model works and how it is applied to Internet applications. To this end, students will implement straightforward static and dynamic web pages. Dynamic web pages may also include data retrieved from a database. This module includes basic concepts of: Internet Protocol (IP), TCP (Transfer Control Protocol), HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Internet Service Providers (ISPs), the Domain Name System (DNS), client-server model, mark-up languages, client-side programming and server-side programming. At the end of the module, successful students will be able to solve simple problems in the implementation and maintenance of applications for the Internet environment. Further details on how the learning outcomes of the module will be achieved will be described in the module guide. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Principles of Networked Systems

    Computer networks underpin almost every form of computing application, so it is important to appreciate the principles of operation these networks. But computer networks are also extremely complex and hard to understand. This module looks at network applications, and the requirements that different kinds of application demand of the underlying network, and how those requirements may be characterised. It then looks at the performance of networks, and why the network so often seems to be a bottleneck in computer applications. This will lead us into an increasingly detailed examination of what happens when network applications are executed, and introduce some of the more important terminology and principles of the subject. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery guide.

  • Programming & Program Design 1

    This module is concerned with developing further the skills necessary to produce a computer-based solution to more complex specified problems in a high level language. Students will gain an appreciation of some of the issues in program design and will be given the opportunity to make informed decisions in their practical work based on some of the principles of good program design. There will also be emphasis on professional issues such as adequate testing, use of de-bugging techniques and documentation. Program code will be expected not only to meet given specification, but also to be readable, maintainable and well designed. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Programming Principles

    This module is primarily concerned with developing basic skills necessary to produce computer-based solutions to simple problems in a high level language. The emphasis will be on basic programming principles : the structure and syntax of a program in the given programming language, variables and data types, operations and the evaluation of expressions, control structures (sequence, selection, iteration and subroutine call),modularisation(including procedures/functions). Program code will be expected to perform according to specification, be readable, maintainable and well designed. Although the given problems will be relatively simple, there will also be an appreciation of how simple solutions can be used in the solution of more complex problems. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • System Requirements

    * have an understanding of the principal stages of requirements engineering and the key challenges in developing usable requirements specifications; * appreciate the range and different types of requirements including both functional and non-functional requirements.

Year 3

Core Modules

Optional

  • Computer Science Development Exercise

    This module provides students with the opportunity to create a system in a professional manner, using and developing an appropriate range of skills and knowledge. The system to be developed will typically be a simulation system and the development approach will be based on the use of exploratory design, technical feasibility and agile methods although reference will be made to structured analysis methods. Personal aspects covered will include communication and group working, while the technical skills will focus on programming and program design, building upon those gained in level 4. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Data Management & Applications

    This module provides an in-depth study of the design and implementation of relational databases. The module views database systems from two perspectives, one being the architecture and functionality of the database management system, the other being the representation of the data managed by the database management system. The module provides the principles and techniques needed to develop relational database systems, together with the database theory on which these principles and techniques are founded. There is a large practical element that allows students to gain experience of using a shared multi-user system in the various roles of a database designer, database administrator and end user. The module also raises an awareness of areas where new types of database are emerging. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Information Technology for Business

    This module leads on from the Business Information Systems level 4 module. It introduces students to the way in which a range of organisations operate and the necessary support that IS/IT provides to the environment of a 21st century organisation. Through the development of a business plan and the use of case study material, students will understand the interrelationships between different business functions and the support required from appropriate business systems, both new and existing, for a successful organisation to compete in the business environment.

  • Operating Systems and Computer Networks

    This module introduces some principles of system software- operating systems, networking, and other system software. Students investigate the application of these principles through a system programming task on a workstation. Theoretical issues are covered in the delivery materials to the extent necessary for the successful completion of the practical part. Some issues, arising either from the delivery or from tutorial question sheets, are discussed in further detail during online tutorials. Students' independent study is mostly dedicated to working on hands-on programming exercises on a workstation. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Programming & Program Design 2

    This module takes a broad view of the nature of programming, exploring a number of different approaches (e.g: procedural, object-oriented, event-driven, functional and logic-based) and the characteristics which make these approaches suitable for different types of problem. The module addresses the program components found in different types of language, how these are related and how programs are constructed using them. Common data structures and algorithms to manipulate them are studied, as is the use of concurrency in program design and implementation. Procedural, object-oriented and event-driven paradigms are likely to be covered in rather more depth than the others, as these are currently employed in the widest range of different contexts. Professional approaches to program design, construction, documentation and verification are further encouraged. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the guide.

Year 4

Core Modules

Optional

  • Computer Science Development Exercise

    This module provides students with the opportunity to create a system in a professional manner, using and developing an appropriate range of skills and knowledge. The system to be developed will typically be a simulation system and the development approach will be based on the use of exploratory design, technical feasibility and agile methods although reference will be made to structured analysis methods. Personal aspects covered will include communication and group working, while the technical skills will focus on programming and program design, building upon those gained in level 4. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Data Management & Applications

    This module provides an in-depth study of the design and implementation of relational databases. The module views database systems from two perspectives, one being the architecture and functionality of the database management system, the other being the representation of the data managed by the database management system. The module provides the principles and techniques needed to develop relational database systems, together with the database theory on which these principles and techniques are founded. There is a large practical element that allows students to gain experience of using a shared multi-user system in the various roles of a database designer, database administrator and end user. The module also raises an awareness of areas where new types of database are emerging. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Information Technology for Business

    This module leads on from the Business Information Systems level 4 module. It introduces students to the way in which a range of organisations operate and the necessary support that IS/IT provides to the environment of a 21st century organisation. Through the development of a business plan and the use of case study material, students will understand the interrelationships between different business functions and the support required from appropriate business systems, both new and existing, for a successful organisation to compete in the business environment.

  • Operating Systems and Computer Networks

    This module introduces some principles of system software- operating systems, networking, and other system software. Students investigate the application of these principles through a system programming task on a workstation. Theoretical issues are covered in the delivery materials to the extent necessary for the successful completion of the practical part. Some issues, arising either from the delivery or from tutorial question sheets, are discussed in further detail during online tutorials. Students' independent study is mostly dedicated to working on hands-on programming exercises on a workstation. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module guide.

  • Programming & Program Design 2

    This module takes a broad view of the nature of programming, exploring a number of different approaches (e.g: procedural, object-oriented, event-driven, functional and logic-based) and the characteristics which make these approaches suitable for different types of problem. The module addresses the program components found in different types of language, how these are related and how programs are constructed using them. Common data structures and algorithms to manipulate them are studied, as is the use of concurrency in program design and implementation. Procedural, object-oriented and event-driven paradigms are likely to be covered in rather more depth than the others, as these are currently employed in the widest range of different contexts. Professional approaches to program design, construction, documentation and verification are further encouraged. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the guide.

Year 5

Core Modules

Optional

  • Computer Network Protocols & Architecture

    This module gives students an opportunity to reappraise the fundamental principles of computer networks, and to explore their internal architectures, and the ways in which they can be used. The module is intended to provide a framework for understanding the details of different systems, so that whether as a purchaser, a developer, or a researcher you will be able to rapidly assimilate the details relevant to a particular situation and apply the knowledge, experience, and understanding gained on this course to whatever environment you may be faced with in the future. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Computer Science Project

    The Computer Science project gives students a chance to extend and deepen their knowledge of Computer Science and to apply it in an unfamiliar context. The project should be chosen to fit in with the student's chosen award title, prior experience and personal objectives. Students are required to undertake a substantial piece of practical work, which they plan and manage themselves under the guidance of a project tutor and with the support of online learning activities on key issues for a project, such as the appropriate use of information sources. Students are expected to report on their progress at a number of points during the project and are required to deliver the results of their work, and a final report, at the end. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Databases

    This module provides the principles and techniques needed to design and use relational database systems of moderate complexity, and practical experience in doing so, based on an understanding of database theory. The module also provides an introduction to some new and emerging trends in the database field to give an appreciation of the wide range of ongoing investigations. Sufficient theoretical background is covered to enable students to make use of articles and papers in database publications. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Design and Development

    This module is designed for students who want to deepen and extend their knowledge of Computer Science by conducting a practical project in the domain of e-learning. As part of the project, students will also be required to develop an understanding of the context within which e-learning applications are used, and the implications this has for Computer Science professionals involved in the design and development of such applications. Topic areas to be covered as part of this module may include: collaborative filtering, e-assessment, e-portfolios, peer review systems, personalisation techniques, and Web 2.0 technologies. It should be noted that some of the topic areas above may also be applied to domains other than e-learning. In order to choose a suitable project, students will be required to research academic papers and journals in the field of e-learning. Although students will be provided with an introduction to server-side technologies, it is expected that they will demonstrate initiative and the ability to solve technical problems (including complex ones) with minimal supervision or direction. E-learning is a dynamic area, and the topic areas covered may be changed to maintain the relevance of the module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Further Object Orientated Development

    This module furthers students' understanding of object-oriented technology in the analysis, design and implementation of software systems. It encourages the student to think about and model real-world problems in an object-oriented way. It explores the contribution that concepts such as abstraction, encapsulation and inheritance can make to the improvement of software quality, and how typical uses of these concepts can be captured and reused. Standard architectures that support the reuse of software components, and the distribution of object-oriented systems across multiple hosts, will be investigated. Students will gain practical experience of a range of techniques, and have the opportunity to use industry-standard tools for system development and implementation. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Object-Oriented Programming

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Quantum Computing

    Quantum Information Processing is an extremely active research area exploiting fundamental quantum phenomena in new applications from computation, secure data communication and information processing. A major paradigm shift, the area is of significant interest and potential benefit to both computer and physical scientists. This module will be theoretical in nature, exploring concepts and applications from the area of Quantum Information Processing with an emphasis on Quantum Computing. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • User Experience Design

    This module explores the body of knowledge underpinning the field of User Experience, including how factors such as system, user and the context of use influence the user experience. User Experience is a very broad domain, encompassing many different fields of study. For us in this module, much of the work will focus on concepts and techniques that can be applied to the design of user interfaces and implementation of software prototypes. Furthermore, it will explore methodologies that can be used in evaluating User Experience designs.

Year 6

Core Modules

Optional

  • Computer Network Protocols & Architecture

    This module gives students an opportunity to reappraise the fundamental principles of computer networks, and to explore their internal architectures, and the ways in which they can be used. The module is intended to provide a framework for understanding the details of different systems, so that whether as a purchaser, a developer, or a researcher you will be able to rapidly assimilate the details relevant to a particular situation and apply the knowledge, experience, and understanding gained on this course to whatever environment you may be faced with in the future. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Computer Science Project

    The Computer Science project gives students a chance to extend and deepen their knowledge of Computer Science and to apply it in an unfamiliar context. The project should be chosen to fit in with the student's chosen award title, prior experience and personal objectives. Students are required to undertake a substantial piece of practical work, which they plan and manage themselves under the guidance of a project tutor and with the support of online learning activities on key issues for a project, such as the appropriate use of information sources. Students are expected to report on their progress at a number of points during the project and are required to deliver the results of their work, and a final report, at the end. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Databases

    This module provides the principles and techniques needed to design and use relational database systems of moderate complexity, and practical experience in doing so, based on an understanding of database theory. The module also provides an introduction to some new and emerging trends in the database field to give an appreciation of the wide range of ongoing investigations. Sufficient theoretical background is covered to enable students to make use of articles and papers in database publications. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • E-Learning Applications Design and Development

    This module is designed for students who want to deepen and extend their knowledge of Computer Science by conducting a practical project in the domain of e-learning. As part of the project, students will also be required to develop an understanding of the context within which e-learning applications are used, and the implications this has for Computer Science professionals involved in the design and development of such applications. Topic areas to be covered as part of this module may include: collaborative filtering, e-assessment, e-portfolios, peer review systems, personalisation techniques, and Web 2.0 technologies. It should be noted that some of the topic areas above may also be applied to domains other than e-learning. In order to choose a suitable project, students will be required to research academic papers and journals in the field of e-learning. Although students will be provided with an introduction to server-side technologies, it is expected that they will demonstrate initiative and the ability to solve technical problems (including complex ones) with minimal supervision or direction. E-learning is a dynamic area, and the topic areas covered may be changed to maintain the relevance of the module. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Further Object Orientated Development

    This module furthers students' understanding of object-oriented technology in the analysis, design and implementation of software systems. It encourages the student to think about and model real-world problems in an object-oriented way. It explores the contribution that concepts such as abstraction, encapsulation and inheritance can make to the improvement of software quality, and how typical uses of these concepts can be captured and reused. Standard architectures that support the reuse of software components, and the distribution of object-oriented systems across multiple hosts, will be investigated. Students will gain practical experience of a range of techniques, and have the opportunity to use industry-standard tools for system development and implementation. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • Object-Oriented Programming

    This module introduces the basic facilities found in procedural and object-oriented programming languages. It develops the skills needed to use such languages to build and verify high quality programs to solve clearly-specified problems. It assumes no previous programming experience and uses a practical approach and up-to-date tools to explore the basic principles underlying modern approaches to program development.

  • Quantum Computing

    Quantum Information Processing is an extremely active research area exploiting fundamental quantum phenomena in new applications from computation, secure data communication and information processing. A major paradigm shift, the area is of significant interest and potential benefit to both computer and physical scientists. This module will be theoretical in nature, exploring concepts and applications from the area of Quantum Information Processing with an emphasis on Quantum Computing. Content will vary according to current research directions. A more detailed description of the module content is provided in the module delivery information for students.

  • User Experience Design

    This module explores the body of knowledge underpinning the field of User Experience, including how factors such as system, user and the context of use influence the user experience. User Experience is a very broad domain, encompassing many different fields of study. For us in this module, much of the work will focus on concepts and techniques that can be applied to the design of user interfaces and implementation of software prototypes. Furthermore, it will explore methodologies that can be used in evaluating User Experience designs.

Fees & funding

Fees 2015

This course is studied over 3 levels, Level 4, 5 and 6 over a period of 5 or 6 years.

Level 4 and 5 are studied part-time over 4 years, and level 6 can be studied part time over 2 years or full time over 1 year.

You will need 360 credits to achieve the qualification.

A typical part-time study rate is 60 credits per year, based on this level of study the total cost per year will be £2200.

A typical full time study is 120 credits per year, based on this level of study the total cost per year will be £4400.

Total course fee for enrolment in the academic year 2015/2016 is £13200. *

There are three payment options:

  • Pay the total course fee up front
  • Pay only for the modules you are registered on
  • Pay in instalments per year

*Fees are subject to change in line with government changes and inflation

Additional course costs

For more details about fees and funding visit UH Online's fees page

Scholarships

Find out more about scholarships for UK/EU and international students

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

How to apply

2016

Start DateEnd DateLink
26/09/201631/07/2017Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
16/01/201716/01/2018Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
26/09/201620/09/2017Apply online (Distance (Part Time))
16/01/201717/01/2018Apply online (Distance (Part Time))

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
25/09/201731/07/2018Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
15/01/201818/01/2019Apply online (Distance (Full Time))
25/09/201720/09/2018Apply online (Distance (Part Time))
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