BA (Hons) Business/Eastern Languages with Optional Sandwich Placement/ Study Abroad

About the course

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Business

You don’t need any prior knowledge of business studies before choosing this subject. You will gain a broad introduction to the subject in your first year. If you choose to continue business as a joint subject or increase to major in business you will have access to a range of optional modules allowing you to tailor your studies to your own personal interests.

Your studies in business will prepare you for work in a range of organisations and you will have the opportunity to further prepare for the workplace by taking a one year paid work placement in between your second and final year.

Mandarin

Explore Mandarin Chinese as well as exploring the cultural facets of the Mandarin Chinese speaking world. Studying another language also opens opportunities to assess your own cultural background and promotes an awareness of the differences and similarities between your own cultural background and the Chinese culture. Mandarin Chinese is taught at beginner level at the University of Hertfordshire, students do not require any prior knowledge of the language.

Mandarin Chinese is available as a minor from your second year. In your first year you will also study English Language and Communication, which will further enhance your understanding of linguistics and facilitate your learning of a foreign language.

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad for a year between your second and final year and the University has good links with universities in Singapore, where a high proportion of the population speak Mandarin Chinese and you will have opportunities to practice your language skills. Studying abroad in a country where the language you are learning is spoken is an excellent way to boost your understanding, improving both your academic results and your employability.

Japanese

Explore the language as well as exploring the cultural facets of the Japanese speaking world. Studying another language also opens opportunities to assess your own cultural background and promotes an awareness of the differences and similarities between your own cultural background and the Japanese culture.

Japanese is taught at beginner level at the University of Hertfordshire, students do not require any prior knowledge of the language.

Japanese is available as a minor from your second year. In your first year you will also study English Language and Communication, which will further enhance your understanding of linguistics and facilitate your learning of a foreign language.

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad for a year between your second and final year and the University has good links with universities in Japan. Studying abroad in a country speaking the language you are learning is an excellent way to boost your understanding, improving both your academic results and your employability.

Study abroad is optional but highly recommended.

Why choose this course?

Business

  • Gain a firm understanding of the role of business in society
  • Develop your knowledge in key areas of business such as Finance, Human Resources Management and Marketing
  • Challenge yourself intellectually while gaining key practical and interpersonal skills that prepare you for the workplace.

Mandarin

  • Explore Mandarin from beginner level, no prior knowledge required
  • Develop skills in an additional language and a cultural understanding of the Mandarin speaking world that will be highly valued by employers in a global job market
  • Gain an understanding of the top language for Business after English (Bloomberg Business language ranking Aug 2011).

Japanese

  • Explore the Japanese language from beginner level, no prior knowledge required
  • Develop skills in an additional language and a cultural understanding of the Japanese speaking world that will be highly valued by employers in a global job market
  • Gain an understanding of one of the top ten languages for Business (Bloomberg Business language ranking Aug 2011)

Entry requirements...

2017 entry 

UCAS are introducing a new tariff for 2017 entry so the points being asked for are substantially different to previous years.

112 UCAS points 

IB - 112 points from a minimum of 2 HL subjects at H4 or above.

GCSE Maths and English Language at Grade 4 or above (Grade C or above under the old grading structure).

All students from non-majority English speaking countries require proof of English language proficiency, equivalent to an overall IELTS score of 6.5 with a minimum of 5.5 in each band.

If you do not have the required IELTS or equivalent for direct entry on to your degree programme, our Pre-sessional English and International Foundation courses can help you to achieve this level.

For country specific qualifications, please visit our Your Country page.

Teaching methods

You'll experience a wide variety of learning styles on this course. During your studies you'll develop your capacity for self-directed study and your interpersonal skills. We particularly emphasise the importance of structured research; well-prepared written and verbal presentations; and computer literacy. Alongside elements of standard lectures, seminars, tutorials and laboratories, you also learn through case studies, individual and group projects and other student centred activities. In your final year you will normally have the opportunity to practice your independent study skills by completing a Major project or dissertation.

Work Placement

You will have the opportunity to take a paid work placement or study abroad for a year between your second and final years, extending your degree from a three year to a four year qualification. You will not be required to pay tuition fees for this year and you will gain excellent experience that sets you apart from the crowd in the graduate jobs market.

A work placement provides you with an excellent opportunity to gain valuable experience and put your theoretical knowledge and understanding from your studies in to practice.

Our Careers and Placements service will help you to develop your CV and support you through the application process for a wide range of placement opportunities in a variety of sectors and organisations.

Study Abroad

This course offers you the opportunity to study abroad in the Sandwich Year through the University's study abroad programme. Study abroad opportunities are available worldwide and in Europe under the Erasmus+ Programme.
Find out more about Study abroad opportunities

Structure

Level 4

Core Modules

  • Principles of Marketing

    Credits: 15

    This initial marketing module, which assumes no prior knowledge of marketing, aims to introduce students to some of the key ideas of marketing and is suitable for both marketing and non-marketing students. It examines the environment within which organisations operate and the role of marketing within the organisation so that students can understand the context within which marketing personnel work, and the different activities which are carried out under the umbrella term of 'marketing'. Concepts central to an understanding of marketing are considered - segmentation; targeting and positioning; the product life cycle; the 4Ps; buyer behaviour, etc.

  • Global Perspectives in Business

    Credits: 15

    Internationalisation of business is creating a substantial increase in intercultural contact, which is reflected in the skills set of managers operating in a globalised world. Managers need to develop sensitivity to and a critical understanding of issues arising out of cultural difference, and be equipped to manage and operate in diversity. The module explores themes of: a) concepts of culture, b) cultural differences and c) globalisation. It will also explore related ideas such as ethnocentrism and prejudice. It looks at and draws upon the work of leading theorists, such as Hofstede and Trompenaars, in the analysis of cultural difference. It will look at cross-cultural differences in communication and negotiation style. The workshop element of the module will consider the practical consequences of cultural difference for corporations and sojourners. Types of international corporate culture will be examined. The nature of culture shock will be explored.

  • Quantitative Methods for Business (UJH)

    Credits: 15

    This module introduces the student to a number of essential mathematical and statistical techniques that are extensively used in business and management. Particular attention will be paid to the circumstances in which the methods considered should be employed. The following quantitative methods are likely to be included in this module: equations and graphs; measures of location and dispersion; weighted averages and indices; probability and normal distribution; basic optimisation; critical path analysis; correlation and simple linear regression; time series forecasting; investment; simulation. Appropriate software (eg Excel) will be used to support learning.

  • Financial Analysis Techniques

    Credits: 15

    The module provides an introduction to accounting from the manager's viewpoint. Areas covered include the collection and reporting of accounting information to both internal and external users, as well as the use and interpretation of publicly available accounting information. The role of accounting in supporting the management functions of planning, control and decision-making is also covered. Indicative topics include: - preparation and presentation of a simple income statement and balance sheet, including the need for adjustments such as depreciation, accruals, prepayments and bad debts; - the difference between profit and cash; - interpretation of an income statement and a balance sheet using ratio analysis; - costing: cost behaviour; marginal costing - methods and uses; absorption costing - methods and uses; - budgeting: nature and purpose of budgeting; its contribution to planning, control and motivation in an organisation; preparation of simple budgets.

  • Language Analysis

    Credits: 15

    The module presents an introduction to some of the core areas of interest within the study of formal aspects of language. In particular it will introduce you to the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics, and discuss the relevance of these fields of study to the study of language and communication in a wider sense.

Optional

  • Language and Mind

    Credits: 15

    The aim of this module is to enable you to gain an insight into the relation between language and mind. We start with a characterisation of communication systems and with a discussion in what ways human language differs from animal communication. In the light of studies that have tried to teach language to chimpanzees we further explore the question whether the ability for ‘grammar’ is unique in humans. We then look at particular brain structures that are important for language functions and what happens when these structures are affected by a stroke. We will also look at the question whether language influences the way we think. Children’s acquisition of language and cases of language deprivation are other topics on this module. The notion of a ‘critical period’ in language acquisition will be applied to first and second language acquisition and we will conclude with a discussion of different approaches to language learning.

  • Mandarin Route A - 4a

    Credits: 15

    This module will enable students to communicate in Mandarin Chinese at a basic level in a range of everyday social situations. Students will learn to talk about themselves and their daily life, carry out reading and listening tasks and write short texts within the framework of the vocabulary and grammatical structures studied. The module will be delivered via on-line materials, including video clips and Chinese websites.

  • Mandarin Route A - 4b

    Credits: 15

    This module will enable students to communicate in Mandarin Chinese at a basic level in a range of everyday social situations. Students will learn to talk about themselves and their daily life, carry out reading (pinyin) and listening tasks and write short texts within the framework of the vocabulary and grammatical structures studied. The module will be delivered via on-line materials including video clips and Chinese websites.

  • Japanese Route A - 4a

    Credits: 15

    This module will enable students to communicate in Japanese at a basic level in a range of everyday social situations. Students will learn to talk about themselves and their daily life, carry out reading and listening tasks and write short texts within the framework of the vocabulary and grammatical structures studied. The module will be course book based, supplemented by on-line materials including for example video clips, blogs and magazine websites.

  • Japanese Route A - 4b

    Credits: 15

    This module will enable students to communicate further in Japanese at a basic level in a range of everyday social situations. Students will learn to talk about past and forthcoming events, carry out reading and listening tasks and write short texts within the framework of the vocabulary and grammatical structures studied. The module will be course book based, supplemented by on-line materials including for example video clips, blogs and magazine websites.

  • Communication, Interaction, Context

    Credits: 15

    The focus of this module is on “language in inter-action”. It sets out to maximise awareness of the factors at play when we communicate with others. Language is used to ‘do’ things in communicative situations and we look at several theories that seek to explain how this is achieved, e.g. Grice’s (1989) Theory of Cooperation and Politeness Theory (Brown and Levinson 1987). We also explore how we understand what someone is saying to us when much of the language we use is ambiguous, implied or figurative. Communication involves more than a code, and we explore the role of context, the knowledge we bring to conversations and the importance of ‘Theory of Mind’ in understanding what someone says to us. The first part of the module will be concerned with face to face communication, but in the second part, we will focus on computer mediated communication including communication through social media.

Fees & funding

The government has yet to announce the upper limit of Tuition Fees for applicants wishing to study an undergraduate course in 2018/19. As soon as this information becomes available, our website will be updated and we will contact everyone who has applied to the University to advise them of their Tuition Fee.

Fees 2017

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2017 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,350 for the 2017 academic year

Fees 2018

UK/EU Students

Full time: £9,250 for the 2018 academic year

International Students

Full time: £11,950 for the 2018 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

View detailed information about tuition fees

Other financial support

Find out more about other financial support available to UK and EU students

Living costs / accommodation

The University of Hertfordshire offers a great choice of student accommodation, on campus or nearby in the local area, to suit every student budget.

View detailed information about our accommodation

How to apply

2017

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201720/05/2018Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2018

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201820/05/2019Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)

2019

Start DateEnd DateLink
28/09/201920/05/2020Apply online (Full Time/Sandwich)